About Lukas Eder

Lukas is a Java and SQL enthusiast developer. He created the Data Geekery GmbH. He is the creator of jOOQ, a comprehensive SQL library for Java, and he is blogging mostly about these three topics: Java, SQL and jOOQ.

Oracle GlassFish, or Why You Should Think About Open Source Again

Oracle’s recent announcement about the discontinuation of commercial services for JEE’s reference implementation GlassFish has caused many reactions in the community involved with JEE. The reactions reach from:

This event seems to have a big impact on the whole Java ecosystem as many of the above people are key players and influencers in our community, and they neither agree nor know what this step by Oracle means for the future of JEE.

The most interesting point of view among all of the above, in my opinion, is tomitribe’s, looking at things from a mere business point of view with respect to Open Source. They’re saying:

Open Source Isn’t Free

Or in other words, “There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch”. And to quote tomitribe even more, a very interesting thought they’re setting out is this:

What this says to me is that we as an industry still do not fully understand Open Source.

We most certainly do not understand Open Source. I’m an Open Source software vendor myself. I believe that Open Source is:

An excellent marketing tool

People look at Open Source as something “generally good”. When I talked about jOOQ at conferences and when it was an all-Open-Source piece of software (not yet dual-licensed), I got lots of opportunity to do free advertising. This has rapidly changed, now that I am offering an alternative commercial license.

A good tool enabler

I get free access to

The same here. As I’m now a “commercial” software vendor, some tools are no longer accessible to me.

The truth is: Open Source is a business strategy

It really is. And it seemed to have worked well for RedHat or Pivotal in the past. Has it worked for anyone else? We don’t know yet, as most other larger companies have such huge amounts of revenue in “classic” fields that they can simply “afford” Open Source. In fact, they’re so good at investing manpower and innovation into Open Source, it keeps the commercial competition in check, as it is hard to write a better and more complete JEE implementation than Weblogic or Websphere.

Apparently, even Larry Ellison is said to agree that the future of data centers lies within using commodity machines. At the same time, RedHat suggests “trying free” to Oracle.

No matter what the impact of the commercial unsupport of GlassFish on JEE will be, we’re only at the beginning of fully understanding what kind of impact this large scale “freemium” model will have on our world. This isn’t just about the software industry. The whole Internet has brought us “free” stuff. We get:

  • “Free” standards (compare W3C, IETF standards to ISO standards!)
  • “Free” Facebook and Twitter and GMail accounts
  • “Free” newspapers
  • “Free” music and films
  • “Free” commodity services for all sorts of work
  • “Free” work force as we can offshore anything to low-wage countries

This has been picked up recently by Tim Kreider, the author of “We Learn Nothing”, where he depicts how writing “free stuff” for the New York Times helps building “exposure”, and how that’s just nonsense as all this hard journalist work doesn’t pay anymore.

Does building “exposure” ring a bell?

Yes, I can build “exposure” by writing free Open Source on GitHub, and by answering complex questions for free on Stack Overflow. I personally use both tools to advertise jOOQ, no doubt. So I get a service (advertising) for a service (content). My deal appears fair to me. But loads of GitHub and Stack Overflow users contribute … just for the sake of contributing. To whom? To GitHub and Stack Overflow. And why? I don’t know.

So, should you contribute to GlassFish, if Oracle starts decreasing support and loosening interest as they have before with MySQL, Hudson, and other products inherited from Sun?

Let’s remember that Karl Marx has already taught us that our idea of capitalism will inevitably lead us to (citing from Wikipedia):

  • technological progress
  • increased productivity
  • growth
  • rationality
  • scientific revolution

Absolutely! There’s no way that productivity can get any better than by having loads of software developers world wide produce better and better tools (growth, progress) for nothing more than … for free!

So, don’t be a pawn of others’ Open Source strategies

So, instead of contemplating what Oracle’s move away from supporting the Open Source reference implementation of JEE means, become active yourself! Don’t just blindly consume Open Source, make it an option like any other option by consciously deciding in favour of Open Source or commercial software, depending on your specific needs.

Stop advertising their cool products for free at conferences, unless you pull out your own advantage from such an advertisement. Open Source is just yet another business model.
 

Do you want to know how to develop your skillset to become a Java Rockstar?

Subscribe to our newsletter to start Rocking right now!

To get you started we give you two of our best selling eBooks for FREE!

JPA Mini Book

Learn how to leverage the power of JPA in order to create robust and flexible Java applications. With this Mini Book, you will get introduced to JPA and smoothly transition to more advanced concepts.

JVM Troubleshooting Guide

The Java virtual machine is really the foundation of any Java EE platform. Learn how to master it with this advanced guide!

Given email address is already subscribed, thank you!
Oops. Something went wrong. Please try again later.
Please provide a valid email address.
Thank you, your sign-up request was successful! Please check your e-mail inbox.
Please complete the CAPTCHA.
Please fill in the required fields.

4 Responses to "Oracle GlassFish, or Why You Should Think About Open Source Again"

  1. You are missing an important point I think : Open Source is also about a Community. There is one around GF, there is none around WLS

    As for “Open-source is not Free”, better than quoting Karl Marx, you should quote someone closer to us : Richard Stallman who never stopped saying “Free as in Freedom” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_as_in_Freedom:_Richard_Stallman's_Crusade_for_Free_Software). We all have to work and pay the bills. So, having to pay for software is ok. If Oracle had pushed GlassFish harder, we would be paying for support (like customers pay for JBoss EAP).

    “Open Source reference implementation of JEE means, become active yourself! Don’t just blindly consume Open Source”. I completely agree. But it’s difficult to actively support Open Source when the company behind it doesn’t. Another scenario is : give GlassFish to an independent organization (Apache…) and see what happens.

    “Open Source is just yet another business model”. Agree. And Oracle didn’t understand it, that’s why they didn’t make enough money with GF and they dropped it. Making money with OpenSource is difficult, I’m glad RedHat, Pivotal… are showing that it’s possible.

    • Lukas Eder says:

      > “You are missing an important point I think : Open Source is also about a Community.”

      That’s a good reason why I quoted Karl Marx. The “community” was integral part of his later theories even if he didn’t call it that way. :-)

      I particularly didn’t want to quote Richard Stallman. I know what he’s done for Open Source, but these days, Open Source is turning into a different beast than what Richard had in mind, originally. Neither RedHat nor Pivotal fundamentally share the beliefs set out in the GNU licenses. In fact, this is what’s driving them:

      http://finance.yahoo.com/echarts?s=RHT+Interactive#symbol=rht;range=5y

      I wanted to point out that precisely this different beast is what is going to fulfil Marx’s prophecies about higher productivity, lower prices (up to being free), etc. And Oracle will totally understand Open Source, in the very near future. Wanna bet? :-)

  2. > Oracle will totally understand Open Source, in the very near future. Wanna bet? :-)

    I bookmark this page, add a reminder to my calendar, and I meet you here in 5 years. The winner gets a couple of beers ;o)

Leave a Reply


4 − = one



Java Code Geeks and all content copyright © 2010-2014, Exelixis Media Ltd | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Contact
All trademarks and registered trademarks appearing on Java Code Geeks are the property of their respective owners.
Java is a trademark or registered trademark of Oracle Corporation in the United States and other countries.
Java Code Geeks is not connected to Oracle Corporation and is not sponsored by Oracle Corporation.
Do you want to know how to develop your skillset and become a ...
Java Rockstar?

Subscribe to our newsletter to start Rocking right now!

To get you started we give you two of our best selling eBooks for FREE!

Get ready to Rock!
You can download the complementary eBooks using the links below:
Close