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Java Exception Handling Tutorials

Java Exception Handling Tutorials

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Exception handling is the process of responding to the occurrence, during computation, of exceptions – anomalous or exceptional conditions requiring special processing – often changing the normal flow of program execution. It is provided by specialized programming language constructs, computer hardware mechanisms like interrupts or operating system IPC facilities like signals.

In general, an exception breaks the normal flow of execution and executes a pre-registered exception handler. The details of how this is done depends on whether it is a hardware or software exception and how the software exception is implemented. Some exceptions, especially hardware ones, may be handled so gracefully that execution can resume where it was interrupted.

Alternative approaches to exception handling in software are error checking, which maintains normal program flow with later explicit checks for contingencies reported using special return values or some auxiliary global variable such as C’s errno or floating point status flags; or input validation to preemptively filter exceptional cases.

Software exception handling and the support provided by software tools differs somewhat from what is understood by exception handling in hardware, but similar concepts are involved. In programming language mechanisms for exception handling, the term exception is typically used in a specific sense to denote a data structure storing information about an exceptional condition. One mechanism to transfer control, or raise an exception, is known as a throw. The exception is said to be thrown. Execution is transferred to a “catch”.

From the point of view of the author of a routine, raising an exception is a useful way to signal that a routine could not execute normally – for example, when an input argument is invalid (e.g. value is outside of the domain of a function) or when a resource it relies on is unavailable (like a missing file, a hard disk error, or out-of-memory errors). In systems without exceptions, routines would need to return some special error code. However, this is sometimes complicated by the semipredicate problem, in which users of the routine need to write extra code to distinguish normal return values from erroneous ones.

Programming languages differ substantially in their notion of what an exception is. Contemporary languages can roughly be divided into two groups:

  • Languages where exceptions are designed to be used as flow control structures: Ada, Java, Modula-3, ML, OCaml, Python, and Ruby fall in this category.
  • Languages where exceptions are only used to handle abnormal, unpredictable, erroneous situations: C++, C#, Common Lisp, Eiffel, and Modula-2.

Kiniry also notes that “Language design only partially influences the use of exceptions, and consequently, the manner in which one handles partial and total failures during system execution. The other major influence is examples of use, typically in core libraries and code examples in technical books, magazine articles, and online discussion forums, and in an organization’s code standards.”

Contemporary applications face many design challenges when considering exception handling strategies. Particularly in modern enterprise level applications, exceptions must often cross process boundaries and machine boundaries. Part of designing a solid exception handling strategy is recognizing when a process has failed to the point where it cannot be economically handled by the software portion of the process.

Java Exception Handling Tutorials – Getting Started

Simple examples based on Java Exception Handling

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