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JSF Tutorials

JSF Tutorials

In this detailed Resource page, we feature an abundance of JSF Tutorials!

JavaServer Faces (JSF) is a Java specification for building component-based user interfaces for web applications and was formalized as a standard through the Java Community Process being part of the Java Platform, Enterprise Edition. It is also a MVC web framework that simplifies construction of user interfaces (UI) for server-based applications by using reusable UI components in a page.

JSF 2 uses Facelets as its default templating system. Other view technologies such as XUL or plain Java can also be employed. In contrast, JSF 1.x uses JavaServer Pages (JSP) as its default templating system.

Based on a component-driven UI design-model, JavaServer Faces uses XML files called view templates or Facelets views. The FacesServlet processes requests, loads the appropriate view template, builds a component tree, processes events, and renders the response (typically in the HTML language) to the client. The state of UI components and other objects of scope interest is saved at the end of each request in a process called stateSaving (note: transient true), and restored upon next creation of that view. Either the client or the server side can save objects and states.

JSF is often used together with Ajax, a Rich Internet application technology. Ajax is a combination of technologies that make it possible to create rich user interfaces. The user interface components in Mojarra (the JSF reference implementation) and Apache MyFaces were originally developed for HTML only, and Ajax had to be added via JavaScript. This has changed, however:

Because JSF supports multiple output formats, Ajax-enabled components can easily be added to enrich JSF-based user interfaces. The JSF 2.0 specification provides built-in support for Ajax by standardizing the Ajax request lifecycle and providing simple development interfaces to Ajax events, allowing any event triggered by the client to go through proper validation, conversion, and finally method invocation, before returning the result to the browser via an XML DOM update.

JSF 2 includes support for graceful degradation when JavaScript is disabled in the browser.

Note
If you wish to build up your JSF knowledge first, check out our JSF 2.0 Tutorial for Beginners.

JSF Tutorials – Getting Started

Simple examples based on JavaServer Faces

JSF Tutorials – Functions

Learn the most famous functionalities and operations of JSF 2.0

JSF Tutorials – Integrations

Learn how to use JSF with other 3rd party technologies

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