Integration tests with Maven 3, Failsafe and Cargo plugin

Unit testing is available in Maven out of the box. Because of that very often its used for integration tests as well. Major disadvantage of this is that integration tests can take much more time to execute and because no one likes to wait long time every build – tests are just skipped with -Dmaven.test.skip=true flag
In order to execute integration tests with Maven we should use Maven Failsafe plugin. Thanks to that we can quickly run unit tests by calling mvn test or perform integration tests with mvn verify.
Integration tests should run in environment similar as much as its possible to production. If your application is a WAR or EAR package you can use Maven Cargo plugin in order to tell Maven to deploy it on a application server or servlet container and perform integration tests on deployed application.

Maven Failsafe plugin configuration

In order to enable integration test phase failsafe plugin configuration has to be added to pom.xml

<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0"
   xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
   xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">

    ...
    <build>
        <plugins>
            ...
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-failsafe-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.12</version>
                <executions>
                    <execution>
                        <goals>
                            <goal>integration-test</goal>
                            <goal>verify</goal>
                        </goals>
                    </execution>
                </executions>
            </plugin>
         </plugins>
    </build>
    ...
</project>

Now when mvn verify is called all files containing tests matches src/test/java/**/*IT.java will be executed during integration tests phase.

Integration tests are nothing but classes using JUnit or TestNG annotations to tell Maven which method is a test and should use same way of doing assertions like you do with unit tests.  

Maven Cargo plugin configuration

Cargo plugin supports all major application server on the market. In my example I will use default Apache Tomcat 7 installation.

  • tomcat is being started in pre-integration phase
  • tomcat is being stopeed in post-integration phase
<plugin>
 <groupId>org.codehaus.cargo</groupId>
 <artifactId>cargo-maven2-plugin</artifactId>
 <version>1.2.0</version>
 <configuration>
  <container>
   <containerId>tomcat7x</containerId>
   <zipUrlInstaller>
    <url>http://archive.apache.org/dist/tomcat/tomcat-7/v7.0.16/bin/apache-tomcat-7.0.16.zip
    </url>
    <downloadDir>${project.build.directory}/downloads</downloadDir>
    <extractDir>${project.build.directory}/extracts</extractDir>
   </zipUrlInstaller>
  </container>
 </configuration>
 <executions>
  <execution>
   <id>start-tomcat</id>
   <phase>pre-integration-test</phase>
   <goals>
    <goal>start</goal>
   </goals>
  </execution>
  <execution>
   <id>stop-tomcat</id>
   <phase>post-integration-test</phase>
   <goals>
    <goal>stop</goal>
   </goals>
  </execution>
 </executions>
</plugin>

It works pretty well. Now when you execute mvn verify for the first time you can see that Tomcat is being downloaded and started before integration tests run.  

Integration test class example

Now we can finally write useful integration test – that will check if application sends correct error code in response.

import org.apache.http.HttpResponse;
import org.apache.http.HttpStatus;
import org.apache.http.client.HttpClient;
import org.apache.http.client.methods.HttpGet;
import org.apache.http.impl.client.DefaultHttpClient;
import org.junit.Test;

import java.io.IOException;

import static org.fest.assertions.Assertions.assertThat;

public class CheckApplicationDeployIT {
 private static final String URL = "http://localhost:8080/myApp/testURL";

 @Test
 public void testIfAppIsUp() throws IOException {
  //given
  HttpClient client = new DefaultHttpClient();
  HttpGet httpget = new HttpGet(URL);

  //when
  HttpResponse response = client.execute(httpget);

  //then
  assertThat(response.getStatusLine().getStatusCode()).isEqualTo(HttpStatus.SC_OK);
 }
}

Of course integration tests should be more complex and actually test behavior. Right now you can setup Waitr, Selenium or any other solution that fits the best your needs and create real integration tests.  

Conclusion

Do you always should test deployed application in integration tests? Its very useful but not always. If your application depends somehow on user’s ip address you will not be able to change it in different requests.

But if your application is a classic web app with HTML or REST frontend ?€“ then its highly recommended.

Reference: Integration tests with Maven 3, Failsafe and Cargo plugin from our JCG partner Maciej Walkowiak at the Software Development Journey blog.

Related Whitepaper:

Functional Programming in Java: Harnessing the Power of Java 8 Lambda Expressions

Get ready to program in a whole new way!

Functional Programming in Java will help you quickly get on top of the new, essential Java 8 language features and the functional style that will change and improve your code. This short, targeted book will help you make the paradigm shift from the old imperative way to a less error-prone, more elegant, and concise coding style that’s also a breeze to parallelize. You’ll explore the syntax and semantics of lambda expressions, method and constructor references, and functional interfaces. You’ll design and write applications better using the new standards in Java 8 and the JDK.

Get it Now!  

Leave a Reply


9 − = two



Java Code Geeks and all content copyright © 2010-2014, Exelixis Media Ltd | Terms of Use
All trademarks and registered trademarks appearing on Java Code Geeks are the property of their respective owners.
Java is a trademark or registered trademark of Oracle Corporation in the United States and other countries.
Java Code Geeks is not connected to Oracle Corporation and is not sponsored by Oracle Corporation.

Sign up for our Newsletter

15,153 insiders are already enjoying weekly updates and complimentary whitepapers! Join them now to gain exclusive access to the latest news in the Java world, as well as insights about Android, Scala, Groovy and other related technologies.

As an extra bonus, by joining you will get our brand new e-books, published by Java Code Geeks and their JCG partners for your reading pleasure! Enter your info and stay on top of things,

  • Fresh trends
  • Cases and examples
  • Research and insights
  • Two complimentary e-books