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Author Archives: David Green

David Green is a developer and aspiring software craftsman. He has been programming for 20 years but only getting paid to do it for the last 10; in that time he has worked for a variety of companies from small start-ups to global enterprises.

What is software?

What actually is software? It’s obviously not a physical thing you can point at. If I imagine a specific piece of software, where does the software stop and not-software begin? Back to software? What is software? Maybe it’s the compiled binary artifact? An executable or DLL or JAR file. But is that really what software is? Software is a living, growing, ...

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ActiveMQ Performance Testing

java-interview-questions-answers

We use ActiveMQ as our messaging layer – sending large volumes of messages with a need for low-latency. Generally it works fine, however in some situations we’ve seen performance problems. After spending too much time testing our infrastructure I think I’ve learned something interesting about ActiveMQ: it can be really quite slow. Although in general messages travel over ActiveMQ without ...

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Async await in Java

Writing asynchronous code is hard. Trying to understand what asynchronous code is supposed to be doing is even harder. Promises are a common way to attempt to describe the flow of delayed-execution: first do a thing, then do another thing, in case of error do something else. In many languages promises have become the de facto way to orchestrate asynchronous ...

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What craftsmanship means to me

Over a decade ago now I got my first team lead role. It was a reasonably unexpected promotion when the existing team lead left shortly after I joined. This baptism of fire introduced me to line management, but also made me question my career choice. But it was, in hindsight, the beginning of a new journey: of becoming a software ...

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Friction in Software

Friction can be a very powerful force when building software. The things that are made easier or harder can dramatically influence how we work. I’d like to discuss three areas where I’ve seen friction at work: dependency injection, code reviews and technology selection. DI Frameworks A few years ago a colleague and I discussed this and came to the conclusion ...

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Copy & paste driven development

Software development is rife with copy & paste: all of us resort to copy and paste coding sometimes. We know we probably shouldn’t, but we do it anyway. It’s like the industry’s dirty little secret: we mainly just copy and paste code from the internet or from somewhere else in the code base then bash it till it works. But ...

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Never trust a passing test

One of the lessons when practising TDD is to never trust a passing test. If you haven’t seen the test fail, are you sure it can fail? Red Green Refactor Getting used to the red-green-refactor cycle can be difficult. It’s very natural for a developer new to TDD to immediately jump into writing the production code. Even if you’ve written the ...

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Project vs product teams

One of the hardest things for companies trying to be agile is how to structure teams. Back in the bad-old days, teams would form around a project. Then six months later, everyone would dissipate and go onto new teams. By the time a team has formed and become effective it is ripped apart again. You get no sense of ownership, ...

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Cross-functional teams

Cross-functional teams aren’t a new idea. And yet, somehow, we still don’t seem to have got the memo. I was listening to the excellent Scott Hanselman’s podcast “Hanselminutes” last week, he had Angie Jones on to talk about automation. Among all the great advice around ensuring that automation is a first-class citizen in your development process one thing stood out ...

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