So you are a programmer…

Been there. Done that. And suffered for that…
Programming is fun. But there are some other associated stuff we programmers blissfully skip or procrastinate because they are not so cool.
End result?…
Somebody is going to get hurt at the end of the day and that somebody may very well be a ourselves. So here are some stuff I have experienced and some of the stuff I my self have been guilty of doing and insights I gotten from them.
Good ol’ docs
It’s a well documented fact that documentation is.. hmm well.. let me think.. Good to have. Or is it important? Yep I know the feeling :) . But it’s as things turn out, is some thing that needs to be done at the end of day. Who said we programmers do not have to toil for our food :) right?. From a user’s perspective a feature without proper documentation is a near close to a feature which is not there at all. Say you developed a really neat feature and obviously you want people to try it out right? But what if they are not able to wrap their head around how to use it or they have to play a guessing game to get for trying to get it to work and in the process failing miserably? Now not only you have wasted their time but also have earned some bad karma. And yes, an intuitive user interface can go a long way to ease user’s pain but a good, to the point documentation sprinkled on top makes up a recipe that users can’t get enough of.
The Extra Mile
Say you developed this new cool feature. But in the hurry of pushing it off you cut some corners and left some manual step in the usage flow which better would have been done behind the curtains unbeknownst to the user. Now the user has to do this manual step every time he uses your feature which quickly becomes a pain specially if it turns out to be a heavily used feature. Optimize the UX. Cut unnecessary stuff from the user flow. Go that extra mile and users will thank you for that.
Mind your cycle
Go easy on your self. Make your development cycle quicker. Say you have some repetitive process to do in order to make the code you wrote to run in the test environment in order to check whether your feature/ fix is working correctly. Invest some time on automating this process, may be writing a handy script and it will help you to finish your work early and then go play :) .
Let’s configure it
What if user want to fine tune the size of foo queue holding tasks for the bar thread pool of your program? Oh ok let’s make it configurable via UI then right? Or should we?? Too much configurability thrown at user’s face kills user experience. Do not force your users to fill in stuff which are better left with some sensible defaults every time they use your stuff. It may be that there is no need to configure every nook and corner of your program to make it work the way you want. Decide what should be in and what should be out. Better yet the middle ground to come would be to provide those configurations in an optional advanced configuration section with some sensible defaults which if user sees fit will go and change. And also remember to document them clearly as well so that user knows better when configuring those.
Nasty API docs
Wrong API docs are worse than having no API docs at all. It really happened to me once with a JMS API not working as published in its API docs. And I thought my thread programming was causing it. Took some considerable amount of hairs pulled to figure out the fault is with the API. Since my assumptions of the API derived from the docs were wrong, so was my program. Specially be mindful when you are changing an existing API implementation whether the assumptions and results returned in certain conditions specified in API docs still holds. If not change the docs accordingly.
Carpenters wanted..
Manage your broken windows. You may have to cut some corners and pull out some hacks due to time or release pressures. It’s OK as long as you know what your broken windows are and you intend to repair them the first chance you get. Leave some reminders and attend to them when you get the chance.
Love thy code.
Show that you care so that others will care. If you maintain your code in a good condition the other people taking over or contributing to your code will tend to care about maintaining it the same way. This is specially important in open source settings where you will not be the only one mending a piece of code written by you at the end of the day.
So there goes my list of tidbits on programming for the better. Pretty much regulation and common sense stuff which does not warrant a mention you might say. But as mentioned in the beginning I have been there. Done that. And have paid for that :) . And we keep doing that as well. So I hope this will post serve as a reminder for me at least, when I am on verge of doing some nasty thing next time around :) . Anyway this is just my 2 cents. Please holler if you beg to differ.
Reference: So you are a programmer.. from our JCG partner Buddhika Chamith at the Source Open blog.
Related Whitepaper:

Software Architecture

This guide will introduce you to the world of Software Architecture!

This 162 page guide will cover topics within the field of software architecture including: software architecture as a solution balancing the concerns of different stakeholders, quality assurance, methods to describe and evaluate architectures, the influence of architecture on reuse, and the life cycle of a system and its architecture. This guide concludes with a comparison between the professions of software architect and software engineer.

Get it Now!  

One Response to "So you are a programmer…"

  1. ahmad says:

    Thank you for taking the time to write this advices :)

Leave a Reply


9 − seven =



Java Code Geeks and all content copyright © 2010-2014, Exelixis Media Ltd | Terms of Use
All trademarks and registered trademarks appearing on Java Code Geeks are the property of their respective owners.
Java is a trademark or registered trademark of Oracle Corporation in the United States and other countries.
Java Code Geeks is not connected to Oracle Corporation and is not sponsored by Oracle Corporation.

Sign up for our Newsletter

15,153 insiders are already enjoying weekly updates and complimentary whitepapers! Join them now to gain exclusive access to the latest news in the Java world, as well as insights about Android, Scala, Groovy and other related technologies.

As an extra bonus, by joining you will get our brand new e-books, published by Java Code Geeks and their JCG partners for your reading pleasure! Enter your info and stay on top of things,

  • Fresh trends
  • Cases and examples
  • Research and insights
  • Two complimentary e-books
Get tutored by the Geeks! JCG Academy is a fact... Join Now
Hello. Add your message here.