Android UI: Layouts with View Groups and Fragments

This article is part of our Academy Course titled Android UI Design – Basics. In this course, you will get a look at the fundamentals of Android UI design. You will understand user input, views and layouts, as well as adapters and fragments. Check it out here!             Table Of Contents 1. Overview 2. Layout ...

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Android UI: Understanding Views

This article is part of our Academy Course titled Android UI Design – Basics. In this course, you will get a look at the fundamentals of Android UI design. You will understand user input, views and layouts, as well as adapters and fragments. Check it out here!             Table Of Contents 1. Overview 2. Views ...

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Android UI Overview

This article is part of our Academy Course titled Android UI Design – Basics. In this course, you will get a look at the fundamentals of Android UI design. You will understand user input, views and layouts, as well as adapters and fragments. Check it out here!             Table Of Contents 1. Introduction 2. Android ...

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Fools Don’t Write Unit Tests

“We don’t have time to write unit tests” or “We don’t have the budget for unit testing” are complaints I hear very often. Sometimes it may sound like, “We don’t use TDD, so that’s why there are no unit tests,” or even “TDD is too expensive for us now.” I’m sure you’ve heard this or even said it yourself. It ...

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Easy Blue-Green Deployments on Amazon EC2

Amazon EC2 Container Service (ECS) is Amazon’s solution for running and orchestrating Docker containers. It provides an interface for defining and deploying Docker containers to run on clusters of EC2 instances. The initial setup and configuration of an ECS cluster is not exactly trivial, but once configured it works well and makes running and scaling container-based applications relatively easy. ECS ...

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The performance impact of scripting in processes

We often see people using the scripting (for example in a service task, execution listener, etc.) for various purposes. Using scripts versus Java logic makes often sense: It does not need to be packaged into a jar and put on the classpath It makes the process definition more understandable: no need to look into different files The logic is part of the process ...

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Need Robust Software? Make It Fragile

In any software project, the goal is to create something stable. We don’t want it to break in front of a user. We also don’t want our website to show an “internal application error” instead of a web page. We want our software to work, not fail. That’s a perfectly valid and logical desire, but in order to achieve that, ...

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“Forget me” and Tests

Your users have profiles on your web application. And normally you should give them a way to delete their profiles (at least that’s what the European Court has decided). That “simply” means you need to have a /forget-me endpoint which deletes every piece of data for the current user. From the database, from the file storage, from the search engine, ...

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When Do You Stop Testing?

There is a software to be tested. There is a team of testers. There is some money in the budget. There is some time in the schedule. We start right now. Testers are trying to break the product, finding bugs, reporting bugs, communicating with programmers when necessary, doing their best to find what’s wrong. Eventually they stop and say “we’re ...

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