Home » Java » Enterprise Java » Spring Batch as Wildfly Module

About Roberto Cortez

Roberto Cortez

My name is Roberto Cortez and I was born in Venezuela, but I have spent most of my life in Coimbra – Portugal, where I currently live. I am a professional Java Developer working in the software development industry, with more than 8 years of experience in business areas like Finance, Insurance and Government. I work with many Java based technologies like JavaEE, Spring, Hibernate, GWT, JBoss AS and Maven just to name a few, always relying on my favorite IDE: IntelliJ IDEA.

Most recently, I became a Freelancer / Independent Contractor. My new position is making me travel around the world (an old dream) to customers, but also to attend Java conferences. The direct contact with the Java community made me want to become an active member in the community itself. For that reason, I have created the Coimbra Java User Group, started to contribute to Open Source on Github and launched my own blog (www.radcortez.com), so I can share some of the knowledge that I gained over the years.

Spring Batch as Wildfly Module

For a long time, the Java EE specification was lacking a Batch Processing API. Today, this is an essential necessity for enterprise applications. This was finally fixed with the JSR-352 Batch Applications for the Java Platform now available in Java EE 7. The JSR-352 got it’s inspiration from the Spring Batch counterpart. Both cover the same concepts, although the resulting API’s are a bit different.

Since the Spring team also collaborated in the JSR-352, it was only a matter of time for them to provide an implementation based on Spring Batch. The latest major version of Spring Batch (version 3), now supports the JSR-352.

I’m a Spring Batch user for many years and I’ve always enjoyed that the technology had a interesting set of built-in readers and writers. These allowed you to perform the most common operations required by batch processing. Do you need to read data from a database? You could use JdbcCursorItemReader, how about writing data in a fixed format? Use FlatFileItemWriter, and so on.

Unfortunately, JSR-352 implementations do not have the amount of readers and writers available in Spring Batch. We have to remember that JSR-352 is very recent and didn’t have time to catch up. jBeret, the Wildfly implementation for JSR-352 already provides a few custom readers and writers.

What’s the point?

I was hoping that with the latest release, all the readers and writers from the original Spring Batch would be available as well. This is not the case yet, since it would take a lot of work, but there are plans to make them available in future versions. This would allow us to migrate native Spring Batch applications into JSR-352. We still have the issue of the implementation vendor lock-in, but it may be interesting in some cases.

Motivation

I’m one of the main test contributors for the Java EE Samples in the JSR-352 specification. I wanted to find out if the tests I’ve implemented have the same behaviour using the Spring Batch implementation. How can we do that?

Code

I think this exercise is not only interesting because of the original motivation, but it’s also useful to learn about modules and class loading on Wildfly. First we need to decide how are we going to deploy the needed Spring Batch dependencies. We could deploy them directly with the application, or use a Wildfly module. Modules have the advantage to be bundled directly into the application server and can be reused by all deployed applications.

Adding Wildfly Module with Maven

With a bit of work it’s possible to add the module automatically with the Wildfly Maven Plugin and the CLI (command line). Let’s start to create two files that represent the CLI commands that we need to create and remove the module:

wildfly-add-spring-batch.cli

wildfly-add-spring-batch.cli

# Connect to Wildfly instance
connect

# Create Spring Batch Module
# If the module already exists, Wildfly will output a message saying that the module already exists and the script exits.
module add \
    --name=org.springframework.batch \
    --dependencies=javax.api,javaee.api \
    --resources=${wildfly.module.classpath}

The module --name is important. We’re going to need it to reference it in our application. The --resources is a pain, since you need to indicate a full classpath to all the required module dependencies, but we’re generating the paths in the next few steps.

wildfly-remove-spring-batch.cli

wildfly-remove-spring-batch.cli

 # Connect to Wildfly instance
connect

# Remove Oracle JDBC Driver Module
module remove --name=org.springframework.batch

Note wildfly.module.classpath. This property will hold the complete classpath for the required Spring Batch dependencies. We can generate it with Maven Dependency plugin:

pom-maven-dependency-plugin.xml

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-dependency-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>${version.plugin.dependency}</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <phase>generate-sources</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>build-classpath</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <outputProperty>wildfly.module.classpath</outputProperty>
                <pathSeparator>:</pathSeparator>
                <excludeGroupIds>javax</excludeGroupIds>
                <excludeScope>test</excludeScope>
                <includeScope>provided</includeScope>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

This is going to pick all dependencies (including transitive), exclude javax (since they are already present in Wildfly) and exclude test scope dependencies. We need the following dependencies for Spring Batch:

pom-dependencies.xml

<!-- Needed for Wildfly module -->
<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework.batch</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-batch-core</artifactId>
    <version>3.0.0.RELEASE</version>
    <scope>provided</scope>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.springframework</groupId>
    <artifactId>spring-jdbc</artifactId>
    <version>4.0.5.RELEASE</version>
    <scope>provided</scope>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>commons-dbcp</groupId>
    <artifactId>commons-dbcp</artifactId>
    <version>1.4</version>
    <scope>provided</scope>
</dependency>

<dependency>
    <groupId>org.hsqldb</groupId>
    <artifactId>hsqldb</artifactId>
    <version>2.3.2</version>
    <scope>provided</scope>
</dependency>

Now, we need to replace the property in the file. Let’s use Maven Resources plugin:

pom-maven-resources-plugin.xml

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-resources-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>${version.plugin.resources}</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <id>copy-resources</id>
            <phase>process-resources</phase>
            <goals>
                <goal>copy-resources</goal>
            </goals>
            <configuration>
                <outputDirectory>${basedir}/target/scripts</outputDirectory>
                <resources>
                    <resource>
                        <directory>src/main/resources/scripts</directory>
                        <filtering>true</filtering>
                    </resource>
                </resources>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

This will filter the configured files and replace the property wildfly.module.classpath with the value we generated previously. This is a classpath pointing to the dependencies in your local Maven repository. Now with Wildfly Maven Plugin we can execute this script (you need to have Wildfly running):

pom-maven-wildfly-plugin.xml

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.wildfly.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>wildfly-maven-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>${version.plugin.wildfly}</version>
    <configuration>
        <skip>false</skip>
        <executeCommands>
            <batch>false</batch>
            <scripts>
                <!--suppress MavenModelInspection -->
                <script>target/scripts/${cli.file}</script>
            </scripts>
        </executeCommands>
    </configuration>
</plugin>

And these profiles:

pom-profiles.xml

<profiles>
    <profile>
        <id>install-spring-batch</id>
        <properties>
            <cli.file>wildfly-add-spring-batch.cli</cli.file>
        </properties>
    </profile>

    <profile>
        <id>remove-spring-batch</id>
        <properties>
            <cli.file>wildfly-remove-spring-batch.cli</cli.file>
        </properties>
    </profile>
</profiles>

(For the full pom.xml contents, check here)

We can add the module by executing:
mvn process-resources wildfly:execute-commands -P install-spring-batch.

Or remove the module by executing:
mvn wildfly:execute-commands -P remove-spring-batch.

This strategy works for any module that you want to create into Wildfly. Think about adding a JDBC driver. You usually use a module to add it into the server, but all the documentation I’ve found about this is always a manual process. This works great for CI builds, so you can have everything you need to setup your environment.

Use Spring-Batch

Ok, I have my module there, but how can I instruct Wildfly to use it instead of jBeret? We need to add a the following file in META-INF folder of our application:

jboss-deployment-structure.xml

jboss-deployment-structure.xml

 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<jboss-deployment-structure>
    <deployment>
        <exclusions>
            <module name="org.wildfly.jberet"/>
            <module name="org.jberet.jberet-core"/>
        </exclusions>

        <dependencies>
            <module name="org.springframework.batch" services="import" meta-inf="import"/>
        </dependencies>
    </deployment>
</jboss-deployment-structure>

Since the JSR-352 uses a Service Loader to load the implementation, the only possible outcome would be to load the service specified in org.springframework.batch module. Your batch code will now run with the Spring Batch implementation.

Testing

The github repository code, has Arquillian sample tests that demonstrate the behaviour. Check the Resources section below.

Resources

You can clone a full working copy from my github repository. You can find instructions there to deploy it.

Wildfly – Spring Batch

Since I may modify the code in the future, you can download the original source of this post from the release 1.0. In alternative, clone the repo, and checkout the tag from release 1.0 with the following command: git checkout 1.0.

Future

I’ve still need to apply this to the Java EE Samples. It’s on my TODO list.

Reference: Spring Batch as Wildfly Module from our JCG partner Roberto Cortez at the Roberto Cortez Java Blog blog.

Do you want to know how to develop your skillset to become a Java Rockstar?

Subscribe to our newsletter to start Rocking right now!

To get you started we give you our best selling eBooks for FREE!

 

1. JPA Mini Book

2. JVM Troubleshooting Guide

3. JUnit Tutorial for Unit Testing

4. Java Annotations Tutorial

5. Java Interview Questions

6. Spring Interview Questions

7. Android UI Design

 

and many more ....

 

Receive Java & Developer job alerts in your Area

 

Leave a Reply

Be the First to Comment!

Notify of
avatar
wpDiscuz