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Tag Archives: JBoss Hibernate

Using Hibernate Bean Validator in Java SE

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The main Bean Validation page states that “Bean Validation is a Java specification which … runs in Java SE but is integrated in Java EE (6 and 7).” This post demonstrates using Java Bean Validation reference implementation (Hibernate Validator) outside of a Java EE container. The examples in this post are based on Hibernate Validator 5.1.3 Final, which can be ...

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How does Hibernate Query Cache work

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Introduction Now that I covered both Entity and Collection caching, it’s time to investigate how Query Caching works. The Query Cache is strictly related to Entities and it draws an association between a search criteria and the Entities fulfilling that specific query filter. Like other Hibernate features, the Query Cache is not as trivial as one might think. Entity model ...

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Custom Boolean User Type with Hibernate JPA

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The ANSI SQL 1999 standard introduced a BOOLEAN data type (although unfortunately only as an optional feature). But to date it still isn’t implemented by most major database systems. As a consequence boolean columns are implemented in various ways. E.g., CHAR columns containing ‘Y’ or ‘N’, or using BIT columns. Subsequently, there is no way for JPA to provide a ...

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How does Hibernate READ_WRITE CacheConcurrencyStrategy work

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Introduction In my previous post, I introduced the NONSTRICT_READ_WRITE second-level cache concurrency mechanism. In this article, I am going to continue this topic with the READ_WRITE strategy. Write-through caching NONSTRICT_READ_WRITE is a read-through caching strategy and updates end-up invalidating cache entries. As simple as this strategy may be, the performance drops with the increase of write operations. A write-through cache ...

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How does Hibernate NONSTRICT_READ_WRITE CacheConcurrencyStrategy work

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Introduction In my previous post, I introduced the READ_ONLY CacheConcurrencyStrategy, which is the obvious choice for immutable entity graphs. When cached data is changeable, we need to use a read-write caching strategy and this post will describe how NONSTRICT_READ_WRITE second-level cache works. Inner workings When the Hibernate transaction is committed, the following sequence of operations is executed: First, the cache ...

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How does Hibernate Collection Cache work

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Introduction Previously, I described the second-level cache entry structure, Hibernate uses for storing entities. Besides entities, Hibernate can also store entity associations and this article will unravel the inner workings of collection caching.       Domain model For the up-coming tests we are going to use the following entity model: A Repository has a collection of Commit entities: @org.hibernate.annotations.Cache( ...

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How to optimize Hibernate EllementCollection statements

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Introduction Hibernate supports three data mapping types: basic (e.g String, int), Embeddable and Entity. Most often, a database row is mapped to an Entity, each database column being associated to a basic attribute. Embeddable types are more common when combining several field mappings into a reusable group (the Embeddable being merged into the owning Entity mapping structure). Both basic types ...

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How does Hibernate READ_ONLY CacheConcurrencyStrategy work

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Introduction As I previously explained, enterprise caching requires diligence. Because data is duplicated between the database (system of record) and the caching layer, we need to make sure the two separate data sources don’t drift apart. If the cached data is immutable (neither the database nor the cache are able modify it), we can safely cache it without worrying of ...

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