Home » Author Archives: Marko Asplund

Author Archives: Marko Asplund

Marko Asplund
Marko is an enterprise technology architect working with client projects across different industry verticals and technologies. His assignments have involved diverse manifestations of server-based architectures, Java technologies and middleware: from SOA to RESTful architectures, from Java to Ruby and from relational to NoSQL databases. He is passionate about continuous improvement in all areas of software development including technology, code design, development practices, methodologies and tools.

Web Framework Benchmarks – Round 10

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TechEmpower Web Framework Benchmarks is a collaborative, open web framework benchmarking project that I blogged about last year (see An open web application framework benchmark). Since the last write-up a new benchmark round has been run with lots of new test implementations. Among others, round 10 benchmark run includes support for the Cassandra NoSQL database, as well as a new Java-based test ...

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What’s the strangest bug you’ve squashed?

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As software engineers we’re tasked with creating solutions to customer’s business problems. Being complex systems, every once in a while flaws inevitably slip in the design or implementation. And sometimes flaws creep in through use of third party software, which can can make problems all the more difficult to track down. Each bug has a story to tell and the ...

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An open web application framework benchmark

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Selecting a platform for your next application development project can be a complex and burdensome undertaking. It can also be very intriguing and a lot of fun. There’s a wide range of different approaches to take: at one end The Architect will attend conferences, purchase and study analyst reports from established technology research companies such as Gartner, and base his ...

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Daemonizing JVM-based applications

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Deployment architecture design is a vital part of any custom-built server-side application development project. Due to it’s significance, deployment architecture design should commence early and proceed in tandem with other development activities. The complexity of deployment architecture design depends on many aspects, including scalability and availability targets of the provided service, rollout processes as well as technical properties of the ...

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Thoughts on The Reactive Manifesto

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Reactive programming is an emerging trend in software development that has gathered a lot of enthusiasm among technology connoisseurs during the last couple of years. After studying the subject last year, I got curious enough to attend the “Principles of Reactive Programming” course on Coursera (by Odersky, Meijer and Kuhn). Reactive advocates from Typesafe and others have created The Reactive ...

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Implementing Jersey 2 Spring integration

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Jersey is the excellent Java JAX-RS specification reference implementation from Oracle. Last year, when we were starting to build RESTful backend web services for a high-volume website, we chose to use the JAX-RS API as our REST framework and Spring framework for dependency injection. Jersey was our JAX-RS implementation of choice. When the project was started JAX-RS API 2.0 specification ...

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Practical NoSQL experiences with Apache Cassandra

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Most of the backend systems I’ve worked with over the years have employed relational database storage in some role. Despite many application developers complaining about RDBMS performance, I’ve found that with good design and implementation a relational database can actually scale a lot further than developers think. Often software developers who don’t really understand relational databases tend to blame the ...

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A JVM polyglot experiment with JRuby

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The nice thing about hobby technology projects is that you get to freely explore and learn new things. Sometimes this freedom makes the project go off at a tangent, and it’s in those cases in particular when you get to explore. Some time ago I was working on a multi-vendor software development project. We had trouble making developers follow Git ...

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