Ilias Tsagklis

About Ilias Tsagklis

Ilias Tsagklis is a senior software engineer working in the telecom domain. He is an applications developer in a wide variety of applications/services. Ilias is co-founder and Executive Editor at Java Code Geeks.

Java Facts to Blow your Mind! (infographic)

With the release of Java 8 scheduled for the coming days, we were on the lookout for some Java facts that would really capture the effect of this programming language to the world.

So, we decided to create a simple infographic depicting some important stats about the history of Java.

The main source of information was Oracle’s Java Timeline. We urge you to have a look at it and discover how Java came to be the incredible platform and ecosystem that is today.

As a high-level overview, here are some totally impressive stats:

  • #1 Development Platform
  • 9 Millions Developers
  • 1 Billion Java Downloads per Year
  • 3 Billion devices run Java
  • 97% of Enterprise Desktops run Java
  • 100% of BLU-RAY Disc Players ship with Java

The verdict is indisputable: The effect that Java has had on our world is stunning. Note that the timeline seems to not have been updated for a couple of years and I am pretty confident that Java’s predominance has grown since then, so those numbers seem to be in the lower end.

To present you the Java facts in a more eye capturing format that you can show your friends, we have decided to create an infographic here at Java Code Geeks. Enjoy!

Click on the image below to see a larger view:

jcg-java-history-facts

Don’t forget to share with your fellow Java developers!

Embed This Image On Your Site (copy code below):

Also find below the stats in a text format.

Language Principles

There were five primary goals in the creation of the Java language:

  • It should be “simple, object-oriented and familiar”
  • It should be “robust and secure”
  • It should be “architecture-neutral and portable”
  • It should execute with “high performance”
  • It should be “interpreted, threaded, and dynamic”

Java Editions

There are four editions of Java defined and supported, targeting different application environments. The APIs are segmented so that they belong to one of the platforms. The platforms are:

  • Java Card for smartcards.
  • Java Platform, Micro Edition (Java ME) — targeting environments with limited resources.
  • Java Platform, Standard Edition (Java SE) — targeting workstation environments.
  • Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) — targeting large distributed enterprise or Internet environments.

Java Versions

Major release versions of Java, along with their release dates:

  • JDK 1.0 (January 21, 1996)
  • JDK 1.1 (February 19, 1997)
  • J2SE 1.2 (December 8, 1998)
  • J2SE 1.3 (May 8, 2000)
  • J2SE 1.4 (February 6, 2002)
  • J2SE 5.0 (September 30, 2004)
  • Java SE 6 (December 11, 2006)
  • Java SE 7 (July 28, 2011)
  • Java SE 8 (March 18, 2014)

Duke, the Java mascot

Duke was designed to represent a “software agent” that performed tasks for the user. Duke was the interactive host that enabled a new type of user interface that went beyond the buttons, mice, and pop-up menus of the desktop computing world.

Duke was instantly embraced. In fact, at about the same time Java was first introduced and the first Java cup logo was commissioned, Duke became the official mascot of Java technology. In 2006, Duke was officially “open sourced” under a BSD license.

Duke is celebrated at Oracle. A living, life-size Duke is a popular feature at every JavaOne developer conference. And each year, Oracle releases a new Duke personality.

JVM Languages

  • BeanShell – A lightweight scripting language for Java.
  • Clojure – A dialect of the Lisp programming language.
  • Groovy, a dynamic language with features similar to those of Python, Ruby, Perl, and Smalltalk.
  • JRuby – A Ruby interpreter.
  • Jython – A Python interpreter.
  • Kotlin – An industrial programming language for JVM with full Java interoperability.
  • Rhino – A JavaScript interpreter.
  • Scala – A multi-paradigm programming language designed as a “better Java”.
  • Gosu – A general-purpose Java Virtual Machine-based programming language released under the Apache License 2.0.

Java and the Future

Java 8 is expected on 18 March 2014

  • JSR 335, JEP 126: Language-level support for lambda expressions
  • JSR 223, JEP 174: Project Nashorn, a JavaScript runtime
  • JSR 308, JEP 104: Annotations on Java Types for Unsigned Integer Arithmetic
  • JSR 310, JEP 150: Date and Time API

Java 9 is expected in 2016 (as mentioned at JavaOne 2011)

  • JSR 294: Modularization of the JDK under Project Jigsaw
  • JSR 354: Money and Currency API
  • Tight integration with JavaFX

References

Related Whitepaper:

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To combat this enemy, your team might already perform functional testing. Even so, you're taking significant risks if you have not yet implemented a comprehensive team-wide quality management strategy. Such a strategy alleviates reliability, security, and performance problems to ensure that your code is free of functionality errors.Read this article to learn about this simple four-step strategy that is proven to make Java code more reliable, more secure, and easier to maintain.

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4 Responses to "Java Facts to Blow your Mind! (infographic)"

  1. Coherent says:

    Thank you Ilias, already retwitted.

  2. NCoherent says:

    So that’s why blue-ray players freeze so much.

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