Home » Tag Archives: RESTful Web Services (page 7)

Tag Archives: RESTful Web Services

Easy REST endpoints with Apache Camel 2.14

Apache Camel has a new release recently, and some of the new features were blogged about by my colleague Claus Ibsen. You really should check out his blog entry and dig into more detail, but one of the features I was looking forward to trying was the new REST DSL. So what is this new DSL? Actually, it’s an extension ...

Read More »

Chained Access Delegation Pattern

Suppose a medium-scale enterprise that sells bottled water has a RESTful API (Water API) that can be used to update the amount of water consumed by a registered user. Any registered user can access the API via any client application. It could be an Android app, an iOS app, or even a web application. The company only provides the API—anyone ...

Read More »

Embedded Jetty and Apache CXF: secure REST services with Spring Security

spring-interview-questions-answers

Recently I run into very interesting problem which I thought would take me just a couple of minutes to solve: protecting Apache CXF (current release 3.0.1)/ JAX-RS REST services with Spring Security (current stable version 3.2.5) in the application running inside embedded Jetty container (current release 9.2). At the end, it turns out to be very easy, once you understand ...

Read More »

RESTful API and a Web Site in the Same URL

Look at Github RESTful API, for example. To get information about a repository you should make a GET request to api.github.com/repos/yegor256/rultor. In response, you will get a JSON document with all the details of the yegor256/rultor repository. Try it, the URL doesn’t require any authentication. To open the same repository in a nice HTML+CSS page, you should use a different ...

Read More »

REST API with JSON

What is REST API? REST stands for Representational State Transfer. It relies on a stateless, client-server, cacheable communications. In most cases it is used with the HTTP protocol. RESTful applications use HTTP requests to POST (create), PUT (create and/or update), GET (e.g., make queries), and DELETE data. REST uses HTTP for all four CRUD (Create/Read/Update/Delete) operations.       What ...

Read More »

Behavior-Driven RESTful APIs

In the RESTBucks example, the authors present a useful state diagram that describes the actions a client can perform against the service. Where does such an application state diagram come from? Well, it’s derived from the requirements, of course. Since I like to specify requirements using examples, let’s see how we can derive an application state diagram from BDD-style requirements. ...

Read More »

RESTBucks Evolved

The book REST in Practice: Hypermedia and Systems Architecture uses an imaginary StarBucks-like company as its running example. I think this is a great example, since most people are familiar with the domain. The design is also simple enough to follow, yet complex enough to be interesting.   Problem Domain RESTbucks is about ordering and paying for coffee (or tea) ...

Read More »

Building a simple RESTful API with Spark

java-interview-questions-answers

Disclaimer: This post is about the Java micro web framework named Spark and not about the data processing engine Apache Spark. In this blog post we will see how Spark can be used to build a simple web service. As mentioned in the disclaimer, Spark is a micro web framework for Java inspired by the Ruby framework Sinatra. Spark aims ...

Read More »

REST Maturity

In 2008, Leonard Richardson published his Maturity Heuristic that classified web services into three levels based on their use of URI, HTTP, and hypermedia. Back then, most web services were stuck at either level 1 or 2. Unfortunately, not a whole lot has improved since then in that respect: so-called pragmatic REST is still the norm.   BTW, I really ...

Read More »

Want to take your Java skills to the next level?

Grab our programming books for FREE!

Here are some of the eBooks you will get:

  • Spring Interview QnA
  • Multithreading & Concurrency QnA
  • JPA Minibook
  • JVM Troubleshooting Guide
  • Advanced Java
  • Java Interview QnA
  • Java Design Patterns