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Tag Archives: Logging

OptaPlanner – How fast is logging?

What’s the cost of trace/debug logging in production? What’s the performance cost of logging to a file? In these benchmarks, I compare the performance impact of logging levels (error, warn, info, debug, trace) and logging appenders (console appender, file appender) on several realistic OptaPlanner use cases. Benchmark methodology Logging implementation: SFL4J 1.7.2 with Logback 1.0.9 (Logback is the spiritual successor ...

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Using Java 8 to Prevent Excessively Wide Logs

Some logs are there to be consumed by machines and kept forever. Other logs are there just to debug and to be consumed by humans. In the latter case, you often want to make sure that you don’t produce too much logs, especially not too wide logs, as many editors and other tools have problems once line lenghts exceed a ...

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Writing your own logging service?

Application logging is one those things like favorite Editors war: everyone has their own opinions and there are endless of implemenations and flavors out there. Now a days, you likely would want to use something already available such as Log4j or Logback. Even JDK has a built in “java.util.logging” implementation. To avoid couple to a direct logger, many projects would ...

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Java Method Logging with AOP and Annotations

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Sometimes, I want to log (through slf4j and log4j) every execution of a method, seeing what arguments it receives, what it returns and how much time every execution takes. This is how I’m doing it, with help of AspectJ, jcabi-aspects and Java 6 annotations:                 public class Foo { @Loggable public int power(int ...

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How to Instantly Improve Your Java Logging With 7 Logback Tweaks

The benchmark tests to help you discover how Logback performs under pressure Logging is essential for server-side applications but it comes at a cost. It’s surprising to see though how much impact small changes and configuration tweaks can have on an app’s logging throughput. In this post we will benchmark Logback’s performance in terms of log entries per minute. We’ll ...

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Locking and Logging

Plumbr has been known as the tool to tackle memory leaks. As little as two months ago we released GC optimization features. But we have not been sitting idle after this – for months we have been working on lock contention detection. From the test runs we have discovered many awkward concurrency issues in hundreds of different applications. Many of ...

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The 7 Log Management Tools Java Developers Should Know

Splunk vs. Sumo Logic vs. LogStash vs. GrayLog vs. Loggly vs. PaperTrails vs. Splunk>Storm Splunk, Sumo Logic, LogStash, GrayLog, Loggly, PaperTrails – did I miss someone? I’m pretty sure I did. Logs are like fossil fuels – we’ve been wanting to get rid of them for the past 20 years, but we’re not quite there yet. Well, if that’s the case ...

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Logging or debugging

Debugging is lame. You should debug log. If your code is structured you do not need debug logging. These are two opinions from the two ends of the line. I am, as usually, standing in the middle, and I will tell you why. First of all, there is no principal difference between debugging versus logging. They are just two different ...

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5 techniques to improve your server logging

In the recent time we’ve seen a plethora of tools that help you make sense of your logs. Open-source projects such as Scribe and LogStash, on-premise tools like Splunk, and hosted services such as SumoLogic and PaperTrail. These all help you reduce mass amounts of log data into something more meaningful. And there’s one thing they all share in common. ...

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