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Tag Archives: Testing

Legacy Code to Testable Code #5: Extract Class

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This post is part of the “Legacy Code to Testable Code” series. In the series we’ll talk about making refactoring steps before writing tests for legacy code, and how they make our life easier. A few years ago I got this from Erik Talboom: “A private method is a design smell”. It took me a while to fully understand it ...

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Agile tester part 2, questions and answers

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Warning: The opinions expressed in this post are mine only, please do not use them against any other group of people, but only against me, that is Augusto Evangelisti a.k.a. Gus. After writing my most recent blog post “The Agile Tester, a Curious and Empathetic Animal” I received quite a lot of feedback for which I am very grateful. Feedback in ...

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Legacy Code to Testable Code #4: More Accessors!

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This post is part of the “Legacy Code to Testable Code” series. In the series we’ll talk about making refactoring steps before writing tests for legacy code, and how they make our life easier. It continues the last post on accessors.   We talked about “setter” accessors as a mean to inject values. The other side of the coin is ...

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AssertJ > Fest > Hamcrest

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I have previously blogged about Hamcrest, and using its assertThat methods in preference to JUnit’s Assert. However, I quickly after discovered FEST Assertions, and happily switched to it. It provides the same improved test readability and improves failure messages as Hamcrest, but has the extra benefit of enabling IDE auto completion, rather than having to search through package and class docs to find the right matcher. Unfortunately, Fest seems to ...

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Legacy Code to Testable Code #3: Adding Setter Accessors

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This post is part of the “Legacy Code to Testable Code” series. In the series we’ll talk about making refactoring steps before writing tests for legacy code, and how they make our life easier. Adding accessors to private state data is an admission that either our design is wrong, or that we’re adding the accessors purely for testing. If that ...

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The Agile Tester, a curious and empathetic animal

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The agile tester (ˈadʒʌɪl/ ˈtɛstə/) is an mammal member of the family “Exploratoris”. He lives in the wild in small groups named cross-functional agile teams.           Skills Besides communication and technical skills, his main traits are curiosity and empathy [1]. Curiosity helps the agile tester in finding opportunities to improve the product. The agile tester questions ...

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Legacy Code To Testable Code #2: Extract Method

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This post is part of the “Legacy Code to Testable Code” series. In the series we’ll talk about making refactoring steps before writing tests for legacy code, and how they make our life easier. As with renaming, extracting a method helps us understand the code better. If you find it easy to name the method, it makes sense. Otherwise, you ...

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Legacy Code To Testable Code #1: Renaming

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This post is part of the “Legacy Code to Testable Code” series. In the series we’ll talk about making refactoring steps before writing tests for legacy code, and how they make our life easier. Renaming is easy and is usually safe. Most IDEs have the functionality, and most languages (I’m not talking about you, C++) lend themselves to safe renaming. ...

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JUnit in a Nutshell: Yet Another JUnit Tutorial

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Why Another JUnit Tutorial? JUnit seems to be the most popular testing tool for developers within the Java world. So it is no wonder that there have been written some good books about this topic. But I still meet quite often programmers, who at most have a vague understanding of the tool and its proper usage. Hence I had the ...

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Tips for (unit testing) JavaBeans

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If you’re writing Java code chances are you’re writing at least a few classes that adhere to the JavaBean conventions, i.e., classes that have private properties with public getter and setter methods, contain a no-arguments constructor, are serializable, and comply with the Equals and HashCode contract. And on top of that you’ll probably also throw in a useful toString() implementation. ...

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