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Tag Archives: Testing

TDD, Code review and Economics of Software Quality

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To understand the value of Junits (developer tests), try maintaining, or worst, refactoring a code base that has none. The cost of  maintaining such code is so high, that in most cases, it gets replaced instead of being improved or enhanced. The developer tests leads to ease of  maintenance and thus enable change. They are now a critical part of ...

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Automated testing of REST-services

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Despite I’m a Java and Scala developer I still passioned a lot in testing of software. If to be more precisely – web applications. It’s really interesting to develop web app and be confident that the apps have a good quality. When I’ve started a career the most popular web architecture was MVC (Model View Control) and there was pretty ...

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Short on Time? Switch to Groovy for Unit Testing

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If you are a programming today, you have most likely heard of Unit Testing or of the Test-Driven Development process. I have yet to run into a programmer that has not heard of both, nor one that says Unit Testing isn’t important. In casual discussions, most programmers seem to feel that Unit Tests are very important and that Test-Driven Development ...

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Writing Clean Tests – Small Is Beautiful

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We have learned that “clean” unit tests might not be as clean as we think. We have done our best to make our unit tests as clean as possible. Our tests are formatted properly, use domain-specific language, and avoid excessive mocking. Nevertheless, our unit tests are not clean because:           When we make changes to the ...

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Writing Clean Tests – Trouble in Paradise

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If our code has obvious faults, we are very motivated to improve it. However, at some point we decide that our code is “good enough” and move on. Typically this happens when we think that the benefits of improving our existing code are smaller than the required work. Of course, if we underestimate our return of investment, we can make ...

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Testing Interface Invariants

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Today’s article is something a little special. It’s the first article where I use code from my current personal project for examples. You will be getting “real world” examples and not silly, made-up examples like my Scientist and Pen example in my factories article. My Project Because of this, I’m going to make a quick introduction to what the project ...

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Nifty JUnit : Using Rule on Method and Class level

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As shown in a the post Nifty JUnit : Working with temporary files, it is possible to use @Rule in a JUnit test, which is a Method level Rule. In this example I would like to show the variation of the @ClassRule for a Class level Rule. Method Rule The @Rule is fired before each test method (just like @Before) ...

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Using junit for something else

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junit != unit test Junit is the Java unit testing framework. We use it for unit testing usually, but many times we use it to execute integration tests as well. The major difference is that unit tests test individual units, while integration tests test how the different classes work together. This way integration tests cover longer execution chain. This means ...

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Refactoring to Allow Test Doubles

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Sometimes, when you make a class, it directly instantiates an object to use in its methods. For example:                   public void myFunc() { MyType object = new MyType(); object.doSomething(); this.thingy = object.getSomething(); } This is generally viewed as bad, since you’re tightly coupling your class to the instantiated one. “But,” you say, ...

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Unit Test, System Test, Red Test, Green Test

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We tend to categorize different types of tests according to what they cover. Unit tests cover small portions of code, usually a method or a class, while we mock the rest of their interaction. Integration tests cover several components in concert, and then mock the other boundaries. System tests and their bigger brothers, End-to-End tests cover more and more. Those ...

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