Home » Tag Archives: Play Framework (page 2)

Tag Archives: Play Framework

Advanced routing in Play Framework

scala-logo

We frequently get questions about how to meet all sorts of different routing needs in Play Framework. While the built in router is enough for most users, sometimes you may encounter use cases where it’s not enough. Or, maybe you want a more convenient way to implement some routing pattern. Whatever it is, Play will allow you to do pretty ...

Read More »

Using twitter4j with Play! Framework and Secure Social is this easy

play-framework-logo

Dur­ing yesterday’s per­sonal Hackathon, I started a project which I might intro­duce here some­time. But the coolest rev­e­la­tion was (again) how easy it was to get up and running. Cre­ate a new Play Project Add Secure Social and con­fig­ure it for Twit­ter, and use the InMem­o­ryUserSer­vice from the exam­ples. (all this is described here http://securesocial.ws/guide/getting-started.html and only takes a minute) ...

Read More »

Understanding the Play Filter API

play-framework-logo

With Play 2.1 hot off the press, there have been a lot of people asking about the new Play filter API. In actual fact, the API is incredibly simple:                   trait EssentialFilter { def apply(next: EssentialAction): EssentialAction } Essentially, a filter is just a function that takes an action and returns another ...

Read More »

Play 2.0 framework and XA transactions

play-framework-logo

XA transactions are useful and out of the box, Play 2.0 today does not have support for them. Here I show how to add that support: First off, some examples when XA is useful: – JPA uses two physical connections if you use entities from two different persistence.xml – those two connections might need to be committed in one transaction, ...

Read More »

Play Framework posted values revisited

play-framework-logo

Working with posted values with Play Framework 2.0, without defining a form mapping, might not be so obvious as it was with Play 1.x, that’s why I’m writing this quick cheatsheet. For this quick sample, let’s define the following view: app/views/index.scala.html @(message: String) message: @message <br /> <h2>Scala form</h2> <form action="@routes.ScalaPoster.save()" method="POST"> scala name: <input name="scala_name"> <br /> scala surname: ...

Read More »

Web development frameworks – part 2 : Play Framework 2.0

play-framework-logo

As the first candidate of our evaluation series we reviewed the Play Framework v2.0. The tutorial and reference documentation used for this article is all available from the Play documentation site. The first part of the article will go over the set of tasks we proposed to do with each framework, then moving on to evaluate each criteria item. Install ...

Read More »

Proof of Concept: Play! Framework

play-framework-logo

We are starting a new project and we have to choose the web framework. Our default choice is grails, because the team already has experience with it, but I decided to give Play! and Scala a chance. Play! has a lot of cool things for which it received many pluses in my evaluation, but in the end we decided to ...

Read More »

Play 2 – modules, plugins, what’s the difference?

play-framework-logo

There seems to be some confusion regarding Play 2 modules and plugins. I imagine this is because the two are often synonymous. In Play (both versions – 1 and 2) there are distinct differences. In this post, I’m going to look at what a plugin is, how to implement one in Java and Scala, and how to import plugins from ...

Read More »

Troubleshooting Play Framework 2 apps on Openshift

play-framework-logo

Troubleshooting Openshift   With the do-it-yourself application type you really get a lot of freedom to support almost any framework or server that can be built and run on a linux box. But you do have to make your homework, and do some research.  So in this article I’ll show you a couple of tips I learnt playing around with ...

Read More »
Want to take your Java Skills to the next level?
Grab our programming books for FREE!
  • Save time by leveraging our field-tested solutions to common problems.
  • The books cover a wide range of topics, from JPA and JUnit, to JMeter and Android.
  • Each book comes as a standalone guide (with source code provided), so that you use it as reference.
Last Step ...

Where should we send the free eBooks?

Good Work!
To download the books, please verify your email address by following the instructions found on the email we just sent you.