Home » Tag Archives: NoSQL (page 5)

Tag Archives: NoSQL

Why Your Boring Data Will Outlast Your Sexy New Technology

nosqlunit-logo

So you’re playing around with all those sexy new technologies, enjoying yourself, getting inspiration from state-of-the-art closure / lambda / monads and other concepts-du-jour… Now that I have your attention provoking a little anger / smirk / indifference, let’s think about the following. I’ve recently revisited a great article by Ken Downs written in 2010. There’s an excellent observation in ...

Read More »

Reactive Cassandra

apache-cassandra-logo

Or an adventure on reading data reactively from Cassandra. Overview Let’s first try to define what reactive means from programming point of view. Functional reactive programming is programming paradigm for reactive programming using the building blocks of functional programming. Functional programming is a programming paradigm, a style of building the structure and the elements of computer programs, that treats computation, ...

Read More »

NoSQL is not just about BigData

nosqlunit-logo

There is so much debate on the SQL vs NoSQL subject, and probably this is our natural way of understanding and learning what’s the best way of storing data. After publishing the small experiment on MongoDB aggregating framework, I was challenged by the JOOQ team to match my results against Oracle. Matching MongoDB and Oracle is simply honoring Mongo, as ...

Read More »

MongoDB “Lightning Fast Aggregation” Challenged with Oracle

mongodb-logo

What does “Scale” even mean in the context of databases? When talking about scaling, people have jumped to the vendor-induced conclusion that: SQL doesn’t scale NoSQL scales It is very obvious that NoSQL vendors make such claims. It has also been interesting that many NoSQL consumers made such claims, even if they probably confused SQL in general with MySQL in ...

Read More »

MongoDB Facts: Lightning speed aggregation

mongodb-logo

In my previous post, I demonstrated how fast you can insert 50 millions time-event entries with MongoDB. This time we will make use of all that data to fuel our aggregation tests. This is how one time-event entry looks like:             { "_id" : ObjectId("529a2a988cccdb538932d31f"), "created_on" : ISODate("2012-05-02T06:08:47.835Z"), "value" : 0.9270193106494844 } Beside the default ...

Read More »

MongoDB Facts: 80000+ inserts/second on commodity hardware

nosqlunit-logo

While experimenting with some time series collections I needed a large data set to check that our aggregation queries don’t become a bottleneck in case of increasing data loads. We settled for 50 million documents, since beyond this number we would consider sharding anyway. Each time event looks like this:           { "_id" : ObjectId("5298a5a03b3f4220588fe57c"), "created_on" ...

Read More »

Spring Data MongoDB cascade save on DBRef objects

mongodb-logo

Spring Data MongoDB by default does not support cascade operations on referenced objects with @DBRef annotations as reference says: The mapping framework does not handle cascading saves. If you change an Account object that is referenced by a Person object, you must save the Account object separately. Calling save on the Person object will not automatically save the Account objects ...

Read More »

Optimistic locking retry with MongoDB

mongodb-logo

In my previous post I talked about the benefit of employing optimistic locking for MongoDB batch processors. As I wrote before, the optimistic locking exception is a recoverable one, as long as we fetch the latest Entity, we update and save it. Because we are using MongoDB we don’t have to worry about local or XA transactions. In a future ...

Read More »

MongoDB optimistic locking

mongodb-logo

When moving from JPA to MongoDb you start to realize how many JPA features you’ve previously taken for granted. JPA prevents “lost updates” through both pessimistic and optimistic locking. Optimistic locking doesn’t end up locking anything, and it would have been better named optimistic locking-free or optimistic concurrency control, because that’s what it does anyway. So, what does it mean to ...

Read More »
Want to take your Java Skills to the next level?
Grab our programming books for FREE!
  • Save time by leveraging our field-tested solutions to common problems.
  • The books cover a wide range of topics, from JPA and JUnit, to JMeter and Android.
  • Each book comes as a standalone guide (with source code provided), so that you use it as reference.
Last Step ...

Where should we send the free eBooks?

Good Work!
To download the books, please verify your email address by following the instructions found on the email we just sent you.