Home » Author Archives: Scott Sehlhorst

Author Archives: Scott Sehlhorst

Scott has been helping companies achieve Software Product Success since 1997, and started Tyner Blain in 2005. Scott is a strategy and product management consultant. He has also worked as a business analyst, technical consultant, software developer, project manager, program manager, and electro-mechanical design engineer. Scott has managed teams from 5 to 50, and delivered millions of dollars in value to his customers.

You Won’t Believe What These Five Lenses Can Show You About Your Product

software-development-2-logo

Fundamentally, product management requires you to assess, synthesize, and prioritize the needs which drive the creation of your product in the context of three main objectives: desirability, viability, and feasibility.  While laudable, these objectives are too abstract to be actionable.  That’s where the five lenses come in (I could not resist the Buzzfeed-styled title). The Product Strategy Grid Steven Haines wrote The ...

Read More »

Features do not a Product Roadmap Make

agile-logo

Last month, Mike Smart of Egress Solutions and I gave a webinar for Pragmatic Marketing on product roadmapping when working in agile environments. We had a great turnout of over 1500 people in the session – with not nearly enough time to answer all of the questions. One attendee asked, “Please explain how a prioritized list of features is not a ...

Read More »

Why Not What – An Example

agile-logo

Forbes quoted Steve Jobs as saying “I’m as proud of what we don’t do as I am of what we do.”  This is a really enlightened perspective – and a way to enforce focus from the top down.  Before you can drive a “this goal is more important than that goal” focus, you have to make sure you’re actually focusing ...

Read More »

Good Enough

agile-logo

We hear a lot about building products which are “good enough” or “just barely good enough.” How do we know what “good enough” means for our customers?  No one really tells us. Different Perspectives of Good Enough There are several important ways to think about a product being good enough – for this article, we will limit the context for discussion to ...

Read More »

Opposite Views of a Product Roadmap

agile-logo

Your product roadmap a view of what you are building right now, in the near future, and in the more distant future.  Or is your roadmap a view of why you are building whatever you’re building right now, in the near future, and in the more distant future? Your roadmap is both – but one is more important than the other – ...

Read More »

Agile Through a Matrix Lens

agile-logo

“Agile” is something most teams do wrong*, without realizing they’re doing it wrong.  A good 2×2 matrix acts as a lens, helping to convert information into insight.  Let’s apply this lens to agile as applied within a company, and see if it helps people decide to do things differently.       When You Say Agile, What Do You Mean? There ...

Read More »

Why Write Requirements

software-development-2-logo

There is a lot of advice out there for how to write requirements. There is not as much discussion about why to write requirements. Spend some time thinking about why you write requirements before you make decisions about how to write your requirements. Why Write Requirements? Whether you communicate requirements through conversation, user stories with acceptance criteria, or traditional structured ...

Read More »

Is Agile Really Cheaper?

agile-logo

There are several ways to answer the question “is agile cheaper than waterfall?” Here are two of my favorites: “It depends. Agile done well is cheaper, as long as you measure correctly.” “You’re asking the wrong question. The right question is: is agile better?” How Agile Is NOT Cheaper The fun thing about relative terms is that you have to ...

Read More »

Use Cases for Iterative Development

agile-logo

Almost everything I’ve read about use cases focuses on describing what needs to be added to your product. Agile development says “get it working first, make it better second.” That means changing the way the software enables a user to do something they can already do. How do you manage requirements for incremental improvement? Iterative Development and Incremental Improvement Iterative ...

Read More »

Provocateurs Gather the Best Requirements

software-development-2-logo

Ask someone what they want, and they’ll tell you they want a faster horse. Provoke them, and they’ll tell you they have a ‘get there faster’ problem, an ‘equine waste disposal’ problem, and issues with total cost of ownership. Thought Provoking If your requirements elicitation session looks like the photo above, you’re doing it wrong. However, just asking people what ...

Read More »
Do you want to know how to develop your skillset and become a ...

Subscribe to our newsletter to start Rocking right now!

To get you started we give you our best selling eBooks for FREE!
Get ready to Rock!
To download the books, please verify your email address by following the instructions found on the email we just sent you.

THANK YOU!

Close