Home » Author Archives: Jim Bird (page 10)

Author Archives: Jim Bird

Jim Bird
Jim is an experienced CTO, software development manager and project manager, who has worked on high-performance, high-reliability mission-critical systems for many years, as well as building software development tools. His current interests include scaling Lean and Agile software development methodologies, software security and software assurance.

Does the PMI-ACP set the bar high enough on Risk Management?

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I’m trying to understand the PMI’s new certification for Agile Certified Practitioners, and what value the PMI brings to managing software development projects using Agile methods. So I bought RMC’s PMI-ACP Exam Prep Guide which is written by Mike Griffiths, a guy who understands a lot about project management and Agile methods, and who has been heavily involved in the ...

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What can you get out of Kanban?

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I’ve spent the last year or so learning more about Kanban, how to use it in software development and IT operations. It’s definitely getting a lot of attention, and I want to see if it can help our development and operations teams work better. What to Read, What to Read? There’s a lot to read on Kanban – but not ...

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Fixing Bugs that can’t be Reproduced

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There are bugs that can’t be reproduced, or at least not easily: intermittent and transient errors; bugs that disappear when you try to look for them; bugs that occur as the result of a long chain of independent operations or cross-request timing. Some of these bugs are only found in high-scale production systems that have been running for a long ...

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Fixing Bugs – if you can’t reproduce them, you can’t fix them

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‘Generally, if you can’t reproduce it, it’s almost impossible to fix’. Anonymous programmer, Practices of Software Maintenance, Janice Singer Fixing a problem usually starts with reproducing it – what Steve McConnell calls “ stabilizing the error”. Technically speaking, you can’t be sure you are fixing the problem unless you can run through the same steps, see the problem happen yourself, ...

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Fixing Bugs – there’s no substitute for experience

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We’ve all heard that the only way to get good at fixing bugs in through experience – the school of hard knocks. Experienced programmers aren’t afraid, because they’ve worked on hard problems before, and they know what to try when they run into another one – what’s worked for them in the past, what hasn’t, what they’ve seen other programmers ...

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Why are some bugs harder to fix than others?

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There are a lot of different factors that impact how long it could take to find and fix a bug. Some of them we’ve already gone over. How good the bug report is – can you understand it, does it include steps to reproduce the problem. And how old the report is – how much could have changed since then, ...

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Fixing a bug is like catching a fish

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Manager: So, how long will it take to fix this bug?  Inexperienced Programmer: An hour maybe? Two tops? I’ll get right on it! Experienced Programmer: Well, how long will it take to catch a fish? It’s hard to know how long it’s going to take to fix a bug, especially if you don’t know the code. James Shore points out ...

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It’s About Confidentiality and Integrity (not so much Availability)

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Everyone knows the C-I-A triad for information security: security is about protecting the Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability of systems and data. In a recent post, Warren Axelrod argues that Availability is the most important of these factors for security, more important than Integrity and Confidentiality – that C-I-A should be A-I-C. I don’t agree. Protecting the Confidentiality of customer data ...

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In Agile development planning, a security framework loses out

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In Agile Estimating and Planning, Mike Cohn explains the different factors that go into prioritizing work on a software development project: financial value, cost, knowledge and risk. He then works through a couple of examples to show how these decisions are made. One of these examples is whether or not to build a security framework for an application – an ...

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