Home » Author Archives: Jason Baldridge

Author Archives: Jason Baldridge

Using Twitter4j with Scala to perform user actions

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Introduction My previous post showed how to use Twitter4j in Scala to access Twitter streams. This post shows how to control a Twitter user’s actions using Twitter4j. The primary purpose of this functionality is perhaps to create interfaces for Twitter like TweetDeck, but it can also be used to create bots that take automated actions on Twitter (one bot I’m ...

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Using twitter4j with Scala to access streaming tweets

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Introduction My previous post provided a walk-through for using the Twitter streaming API from the command line, but tweets can be more flexibly obtained and processed using an API for accessing Twitter using your programming language of choice. In this tutorial, I walk-through basic setup and some simple uses of the twitter4j library with Scala. Much of what I show ...

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A walk-through for the Twitter streaming API

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Introduction Analyzing tweets is all the rage, and if you are new to the game you want to know how to get them programmatically. There are many ways to do this, but a great start is to use the Twitter streaming API, a RESTful service that allows you to pull tweets in real time based on criteria you specify. For ...

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Unix pipelines for basic spelling error detection

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Introduction We can of course write programs to do most anything we want, but often the Unix command line has everything we need to perform a series of useful operations without writing a line of code. In my Applied NLP class today, I show how one can get a high-confidence dictionary out of a body of raw text with a ...

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Processing JSON in Scala with Jerkson

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Introduction The previous tutorial covered basic XML processing in Scala, but as I noted, XML is not the primary choice for data serialization these days. Instead, JSON (JavaScript Object Notation) is more widely used for data interchange, in part because it is less verbose and better captures the core data structures (such as lists and maps) that are used in ...

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Scala Basic XML processing

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Introduction Pretty much everybody knows what XML is: it is a structured, machine-readable text format for representing information that can be easily checked for the “grammaticality” of the tags, attributes, and their relationship to each other (e.g. using DTD’s). This contrasts with HTML, which can have elements that don’t close (e.g. <p>foo<p>bar rather than <p>foo</p><p>bar</p>) and still be processed. XML ...

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Student Questions about Scala, Part 2

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Preface This is the second post answering questions from students in my course on Applied Text Analysis. You can see the first one here. This post generally covers higher level questions, starting off with one basic question that didn’t make it into the first post. Basic Question Q. When I was working with Maps for the homework and tried to ...

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Student Questions about Scala, Part 1

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Preface I’m currently teaching a course on Applied Text Analysis and am using Scala as the programming language taught and used in the course. Rather than creating more tutorials, I figured I’d take a page from Brian Dunning’s playbook on his Skeptoid podcast (highly recommended) when he takes student questions. So, I had the students in the course submit questions ...

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Variations for computing results from sequences in Scala

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Introduction A common question from students who are new to Scala is: What is the difference between using the map function on lists, using for expressions and foreach loops? One of the major sources of confusion with regard to this question is that a for expression in Scala in not the equivalent of for loops in languages like Python and ...

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