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Author Archives: Dustin Marx

NetBeans 8.0’s Five New Performance Hints

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NetBeans 8.0 introduces several new Java hints. Although there are a large number of these new hints related to Java Persistence API, I focus on five new hints in the Performance category. The five new “Performance Hints” introduced with NetBeans 8.0 are:             Boxing of already boxed value Redundant String.toString() Replace StringBuffer/StringBuilder by String Unnecessary ...

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JavaOne 2014 Observations by Proxy

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I wasn’t able to attend JavaOne this year, but have been happy to see some online resources covering what happened at JavaOne 2014. In this post, I summarize some of the observations made at JavaOne 2014 and provide links to references providing these observations or providing more background details on those observations. The listed observations are in no particular order ...

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ChoiceFormat: Numeric Range Formatting

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The Javadoc for the ChoiceFormat class states that ChoiceFormat “allows you to attach a format to a range of numbers” and is “generally used in a MessageFormat for handling plurals.” This post describes java.text.ChoiceFormat and provides some examples of applying it in Java code. One of the most noticeable differences between ChoiceFormat and other “format” classes in the java.text package ...

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Date/Time Formatting/Parsing, Java 8 Style

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Since nearly the beginning of Java, Java developers have worked with dates and times via the java.util.Date class (since JDK 1.0) and then the java.util.Calendar class (since JDK 1.1). During this time, hundreds of thousands (or maybe millions) of Java developers have formatted and parsed Java dates and times using java.text.DateFormat and java.text.SimpleDateFormat. Given how frequently this has been done ...

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Big Java News in Late Summer 2014

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As is typical when JavaOne is imminent, there has been much big news in the Java community recently. This post briefly references three of these items (Java SE 8 updates, Java SE 9, and Java EE 8) and a “bonus” reference to a post I found to be one of the clearer ones I have seen on classpath/classloader issues. String ...

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Java Numeric Formatting

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I can think of numerous times when I have seen others write unnecessary Java code and I have written unnecessary Java code because of lack of awareness of a JDK class that already provides the desired functionality. One example of this is the writing of time-related constants using hard-coded values such as 60, 24, 1440, and 86400 when TimeUnit provides ...

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jinfo: Command-line Peeking at JVM Runtime Configuration

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In several recent blogs (in my reviews of the books Java EE 7 Performance Tuning and Optimization and WildFly Performance Tuning in particular), I have referenced my own past blog posts on certain Oracle JDK command-line tools. I was aghast to discover that I had never exclusively addressed the nifty jinfo tool and this post sets to rectify that troubling ...

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Autoboxing, Unboxing, and NoSuchMethodError

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J2SE 5 introduced numerous features to the Java programming language. One of these features is autoboxing and unboxing, a feature that I use almost daily without even thinking about it. It is often convenient (especially when used with collections), but every once in a while it leads to some nasty surprises, “weirdness,” and “madness.” In this blog post, I look ...

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Books That Have Most Influenced My Software Development Career

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I have read numerous books on software development and have learned valuable things from most of them, but a small subset of these books has significantly influenced me and how I develop software. Effective C++ and More Effective C++ Although I had written a lot of lines of code in BASIC, Pascal, C, and C++ before starting my career, it ...

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Applying S.T.O.P. To Software Development

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The acronym STOP (or STOPP) is used by several organizations (United States Army, Hunter’s Ed, Mountain Rescue, Search and Rescue, Boy Scouts of America), often for describing how to cope with wilderness survival situations or other situations when one is lost (especially outdoors). The “S” typically stands for “Stop” (some say it stands for “Sit“), the “T” stands for “Think” ...

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