About Lukas Eder

Lukas is a Java and SQL enthusiast developer. He created the Data Geekery GmbH. He is the creator of jOOQ, a comprehensive SQL library for Java, and he is blogging mostly about these three topics: Java, SQL and jOOQ.

Java 8 Friday: Better Exceptions

At Data Geekery, we love Java. And as we’re really into jOOQ’s fluent API and query DSL, we’re absolutely thrilled about what Java 8 will bring to our ecosystem.

Java 8 Friday

Every Friday, we’re showing you a couple of nice new tutorial-style Java 8 features, which take advantage of lambda expressions, extension methods, and other great stuff. You’ll find the source code on GitHub.
 

Better Exceptions

I had the idea when I stumbled upon JUnit GitHub issue #706, which is about a new method proposal:

ExpectedException#expect(Throwable, Callable)

One suggestion was to create an interceptor for exceptions like this.

assertEquals(Exception.class, 
    thrown(() -> foo()).getClass());
assertEquals("yikes!", 
    thrown(() -> foo()).getMessage());

On the other hand, why not just add something completely new along the lines of this?

// This is needed to allow for throwing Throwables
// from lambda expressions
@FunctionalInterface
interface ThrowableRunnable {
    void run() throws Throwable;
}

// Assert a Throwable type
static void assertThrows(
    Class<? extends Throwable> throwable,
    ThrowableRunnable runnable
) {
    assertThrows(throwable, runnable, t -> {});
}

// Assert a Throwable type and implement more
// assertions in a consumer
static void assertThrows(
    Class<? extends Throwable> throwable,
    ThrowableRunnable runnable,
    Consumer<Throwable> exceptionConsumer
) {
    boolean fail = false;
    try {
        runnable.run();
        fail = true;
    }
    catch (Throwable t) {
        if (!throwable.isInstance(t))
            Assert.fail("Bad exception type");

        exceptionConsumer.accept(t);
    }

    if (fail)
        Assert.fail("No exception was thrown");
}

So the above methods both assert that a given throwable is thrown from a given runnable – ThrowableRunnable to be precise, because most functional interfaces, unfortunately, don’t allow for throwing checked exceptions. See this article for details.

We’re now using the above hypothetical JUnit API as such:

assertThrows(Exception.class, 
    () -> { throw new Exception(); });

assertThrows(Exception.class, 
    () -> { throw new Exception("Message"); },
    e  -> assertEquals("Message", e.getMessage()));

In fact, we could even go further and declare an exception swallowing helper method like this:

// This essentially swallows exceptions
static void withExceptions(
    ThrowableRunnable runnable
) {
    withExceptions(runnable, t -> {});
}

// This delegates exception handling to a consumer
static void withExceptions(
    ThrowableRunnable runnable,
    Consumer<Throwable> exceptionConsumer
) {
    try {
        runnable.run();
    }
    catch (Throwable t) {
        exceptionConsumer.accept(t);
    }
}

This is useful to swallow all sorts of exceptions. The following two idioms are thus equivalent:

try {
    // This will fail
    assertThrows(SQLException.class, () -> {
        throw new Exception();
    });
}
catch (Throwable t) {
    t.printStackTrace();
}

withExceptions(
    // This will fail
    () -> assertThrows(SQLException.class, () -> {
        throw new Exception();
    }),
    t -> t.printStackTrace()
);

Obviuously, these idioms aren’t necessarily more useful than an actual try .. catch .. finally block, specifically also because it does not support proper typing of exceptions (at least not in this example), nor does it support the try-with-resources statement.

Nonetheless, such utility methods will come in handy every now and then.

Reference: Java 8 Friday: Better Exceptions from our JCG partner Lukas Eder at the JAVA, SQL, AND JOOQ blog.
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2 Responses to "Java 8 Friday: Better Exceptions"

  1. Christian says:

    The Hamcrest assertions syntax is evil! Terrible evil! It even made it as an example for bad code in uncle Bob’s book “Clean Code”. User AssertJ instead.

    • Lukas Eder says:

      It’s just as bad. You’ll see in our next Java 8 Friday post, how you could really just use plain and simple lambdas (if working with Java 8) instead of a quirky DSL

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