JavaOne 2013 Vicariously

I was disappointed that I was not able to attend JavaOne 2013, but was happy to see numerous useful posts covering this annual conference. In this post, I link to many of these resources and provide a brief summary of what each post discusses in relation to JavaOne 2013.

Keynotes

The keynotes are where the “big announcements” tend to occur. Fortunately, several online posts quoted key portions of the keynotes and provided different perspectives on what was said and the implications of the announcements. I group these references by order of my favorite keynotes at JavaOne: technical, strategy, and community.

JavaOne 2013 Technical Keynote

Java 2013 Strategy Keynote

JavaOne 2013 Community Keynote

Technical Sessions

Several blog posts have been written about specific technical presentation sessions, birds of a feather sessions, and hands-on lab sessions.

Overall Impressions and Summaries

This set of links is to posts summarizing the conference as a whole and relaying attendees’ perspectives on the overall conference.

Kevin Farnham’s (java.net) JavaOne 2013 Impressions

Kevin Farnham, managing editor at Java.net, has been posting his impressions from JavaOne 2013 in his editorials alongside the posts he references from Java.net.

Conclusion

This year’s JavaOne appears to have continued many of the themes discussed at last year’s JavaOne including GPUs, Raspberry Pi, Java SE 8 (especially lambda expressions), Java EE 7, NetBeans, OpenJDK, and JavaFX. Of course, there were new announcements related to these themes that included DukePad, open sourcing of Project Avatar, and new OpenJDK participants (Freescale, Linaro and Square)
 

Reference: JavaOne 2013 Vicariously from our JCG partner Dustin Marx at the Inspired by Actual Events blog.
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