Home » JVM Languages » Scala » become/unbecome – discovering Akka

About Tomasz Nurkiewicz

Java EE developer, Scala enthusiast. Enjoying data analysis and visualization. Strongly believes in the power of testing and automation.

become/unbecome – discovering Akka

Sometimes our actor needs to react differently based on its internal state. Typically receiving some specific message causes the state transition which, in turns, changes the way subsequent messages should be handled. Another message restores the original state and thus – the way messages were handled before. In the previous article we implemented RandomOrgBuffer actor based on waitingForResponse flag. It unnecessarily complicated already complex message handling logic:
 
 
 
 
 

var waitingForResponse = false

def receive = {
case RandomRequest =>
preFetchIfAlmostEmpty()
if(buffer.isEmpty) {
backlog += sender
} else {
sender ! buffer.dequeue()
}
case RandomOrgServerResponse(randomNumbers) =>
buffer ++= randomNumbers
waitingForResponse = false
while(!backlog.isEmpty && !buffer.isEmpty) {
backlog.dequeue() ! buffer.dequeue()
}
preFetchIfAlmostEmpty()
}

private def preFetchIfAlmostEmpty() {
if(buffer.size <= BatchSize / 4 && !waitingForResponse) {
randomOrgClient ! FetchFromRandomOrg(BatchSize)
waitingForResponse = true
}
}

Wouldn’t it be simpler to have two distinct receive methods – one used when we are awaiting for external server response (waitingForResponse == true) and the other when buffer is filled sufficiently and no request to random.org was yet issued? In such circumstances become() and unbecome() methods come very handy. By default receive method is used to handle all incoming messages. However at any time we can call become(), which accept any method compliant with receive signature as an argument. Every subsequent message will be handled by this new method. Calling unbecome() restores original receive method. Knowing this technique we can refactor our solution above to the following:

def receive = {
case RandomRequest =>
preFetchIfAlmostEmpty()
handleOrQueueInBacklog()
}

def receiveWhenWaiting = {
case RandomRequest =>
handleOrQueueInBacklog()
case RandomOrgServerResponse(randomNumbers) =>
buffer ++= randomNumbers
context.unbecome()
while(!backlog.isEmpty && !buffer.isEmpty) {
backlog.dequeue() ! buffer.dequeue()
}
preFetchIfAlmostEmpty()
}

private def handleOrQueueInBacklog() {
if (buffer.isEmpty) {
backlog += sender
} else {
sender ! buffer.dequeue()
}
}

private def preFetchIfAlmostEmpty() {
if(buffer.size <= BatchSize / 4) {
randomOrgClient ! FetchFromRandomOrg(BatchSize)
context become receiveWhenWaiting
}
}

We extracted code responsible for handling message while we wait for random.org response into a separate receiveWhenWaiting method. Notice the become() and unbecome() calls – they replaced no longer needed waitingForResponse flag. Instead we simply say: starting from next message please use this other method to handle (become slightly different actor). Later we say: OK, let’s go back to the original state and receive messages as you used to (unbecome). But the most important change is the transition from one, big method into two, much smaller a better named ones.
become() and unbecome() methods are actually much more powerful since they internally maintain a stack of receiving methods. Every call to become() (with discardOld = false as a second parameter) pushes current receiving method onto a stack while unbecome() pops it and restores the previous one. Thus we can use become() to use several receiving methods and then gradually go back through all the changes. Moreover Akka also supports finite state machine pattern, but more on that maybe in the future.
Source code for this article is available on GitHub in become-unbecome tag.

This was a translation of my article “Poznajemy Akka: become/unbecome” originally published on scala.net.pl.
 

Reference: become/unbecome – discovering Akka from our JCG partner Tomasz Nurkiewicz at the Java and neighbourhood blog.

Do you want to know how to develop your skillset to become a Java Rockstar?

Subscribe to our newsletter to start Rocking right now!

To get you started we give you our best selling eBooks for FREE!

1. JPA Mini Book

2. JVM Troubleshooting Guide

3. JUnit Tutorial for Unit Testing

4. Java Annotations Tutorial

5. Java Interview Questions

6. Spring Interview Questions

7. Android UI Design

and many more ....

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*


5 + = ten

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Do you want to know how to develop your skillset and become a ...

Subscribe to our newsletter to start Rocking right now!

To get you started we give you our best selling eBooks for FREE!
Get ready to Rock!
To download the books, please verify your email address by following the instructions found on the email we just sent you.

THANK YOU!

Close