Play Framework posted values revisited

Working with posted values with Play Framework 2.0, without defining a form mapping, might not be so obvious as it was with Play 1.x, that’s why I’m writing this quick cheatsheet.

For this quick sample, let’s define the following view:

app/views/index.scala.html

@(message: String)

message: @message <br />

<h2>Scala form</h2>

<form action="@routes.ScalaPoster.save()" method="POST">
  scala name: <input name="scala_name"> <br />
  scala surname: <input name="scala_surname"> <br />
  <input type="submit" value="save">
</form>

<h2>Java form</h2>

<form action="@routes.JavaPoster.save()" method="POST">
  java name: <input name="java_name"> <br />
  java surname: <input name="java_surname"> <br />
  <input type="submit" value="save">
</form>

And the following routes file:

conf/routes

# Home page
GET     /                         controllers.Application.index

POST    /scala                    controllers.ScalaPoster.save
POST    /java                     controllers.JavaPoster.save

With java, accesing directly the request body:

app/controllers/JavaPoster.java

package controllers;

import play.mvc.*;

import views.html.*;

import java.util.Map;

public class JavaPoster extends Controller {
  
  public static Result save() {

    final Map<String, String[]> values = request().body().asFormUrlEncoded();
    final String name = values.get("java_name")[0];
    final String surname = values.get("java_surname")[0];
    
    return ok(index.render(String.format("You are %s, %s",surname, name)));
  }
  
}

Or using a DynamicForm:

package controllers;

import play.mvc.*;

import views.html.*;

import play.data.DynamicForm;

public class JavaPoster extends Controller {
  
  public static Result save() {

    final DynamicForm form = form().bindFromRequest();
    final String name = form.get("java_name");
    final String surname = form.get("java_surname");
    return ok(index.render(String.format("You are %s, %s",surname, name)));
  }
  
}

Now the scala version, accessing the body:

app/controllers/ScalaPoster.java

package controllers

import play.api.mvc._

object ScalaPoster extends Controller {

  def save = Action { request =>

    def name = request.body.asFormUrlEncoded.get("scala_name")(0)
    def surname = request.body.asFormUrlEncoded.get("scala_surname")(0)

    Ok(views.html.index("You are %s, %s".format(surname, name))) 
  }

}

And defining a form

package controllers

import play.api.mvc._

import play.api.data.Form
import play.api.data.Forms.tuple
import play.api.data.Forms.text

object ScalaPoster extends Controller {

  val form = Form(
    tuple(
      "scala_name" -> text,
      "scala_surname" -> text
    )
  )

  def save = Action { implicit request =>
 
    def values = form.bindFromRequest.data
    def name = values("scala_name")
    def surname = values("scala_surname")

    Ok(views.html.index("You are %s, %s".format(surname, name))) 
  }

}

Notice the implict request in the above sample. You could explicitly pass it to bindFromRequest with

    def values = form.bindFromRequest()(request).data

You can also play with the tuples and issue something like

    val data = form.bindFromRequest.get
    Ok(views.html.index("You are %s, %s".format(data._2, data._1))) 

or

    val (name, surname) = form.bindFromRequest.get
    Ok(views.html.index("You are %s, %s".format(surname, name))) 

And of course, if you just want to read a single posted value you could issue:

    def name = Form("scala_name" -> text).bindFromRequest.get

There are several ways to achieve it. I hope this serves as a useful reminder.

Reference: Play Framework posted values revisited from our JCG partner Sebastian Scarano at the Having fun with Play framework! blog.

Related Whitepaper:

Functional Programming in Java: Harnessing the Power of Java 8 Lambda Expressions

Get ready to program in a whole new way!

Functional Programming in Java will help you quickly get on top of the new, essential Java 8 language features and the functional style that will change and improve your code. This short, targeted book will help you make the paradigm shift from the old imperative way to a less error-prone, more elegant, and concise coding style that’s also a breeze to parallelize. You’ll explore the syntax and semantics of lambda expressions, method and constructor references, and functional interfaces. You’ll design and write applications better using the new standards in Java 8 and the JDK.

Get it Now!  

Leave a Reply


5 − = zero



Java Code Geeks and all content copyright © 2010-2014, Exelixis Media Ltd | Terms of Use
All trademarks and registered trademarks appearing on Java Code Geeks are the property of their respective owners.
Java is a trademark or registered trademark of Oracle Corporation in the United States and other countries.
Java Code Geeks is not connected to Oracle Corporation and is not sponsored by Oracle Corporation.

Sign up for our Newsletter

15,153 insiders are already enjoying weekly updates and complimentary whitepapers! Join them now to gain exclusive access to the latest news in the Java world, as well as insights about Android, Scala, Groovy and other related technologies.

As an extra bonus, by joining you will get our brand new e-books, published by Java Code Geeks and their JCG partners for your reading pleasure! Enter your info and stay on top of things,

  • Fresh trends
  • Cases and examples
  • Research and insights
  • Two complimentary e-books
Get tutored by the Geeks! JCG Academy is a fact... Join Now
Hello. Add your message here.