MongoDB performance testing

So, this morning I was hacking around in the mongo shell. I had come up with three different ways to aggregate the data I wanted, but wasn’t sure about which one I should subsequently port to code to use within my application.

So how would I decide on which method to implement? Well, lets just chose the one that performs the best. Ok, how do I do that? Hmmm. I could download and install some of the tools out there, or I could just wrap the shell code in a function and add some timings. OR, I could use the same tool that I use to performance test everything else; JMeter. To me it was a no brainer.

So how do we do it?

There is a full tutorial here.

Simply put, you need to do the following:

  1. Create a Sampler class.
  2. Create a BeanInfo class.
  3. Create a properties file.
  4. Bundle up into a jar and drop into the apache-jmeter-X.X\lib\ext folder
  5. Update search_paths=../lib/ext/mongodb.jar in jmeter.properties if you place the jar anywhere else.

How I did it

I tend to have a scratch pad project set up in my IDE, so I decided just to go with that. Just to be on the safe side, I imported all the dependencies from:

  • apache-jmeter-X.X\lib
  • apache-jmeter-X.X\lib\ext
  • apache-jmeter-X.X\lib\junit

I then created the two class and the properties file.
I then exported the jar to apache-jmeter-X.X\lib\ext, and fired up jmeter.

Go throunullgh the normal steps to set the test plan up:

  1. Right click Test Plan and add a Thread Group.
  2. Right click the Thread Group and add a Sampler, in this case a MongoDB Script Sampler.
  3. Add your script to the textarea; db.YOUR_COLLECTION_NAME.insert({“jan” : “thinks he is great”})
  4. Run the test

Happy days. You can then use JMeter as you would for any other sampler.

Future enhancements

This is just a hack that took me 37 minutes to get running, plus 24 minutes if you include this post. This can certainly be extended to allow you to enter the replicaset config details for instance and to pull the creation of the connection out so we’re not initiating this each time run a test.

Reference: Performance testing MongoDB from our JCG partner Jan Ettles at the Exceptionally exceptional exceptions blog.

Related Whitepaper:

Functional Programming in Java: Harnessing the Power of Java 8 Lambda Expressions

Get ready to program in a whole new way!

Functional Programming in Java will help you quickly get on top of the new, essential Java 8 language features and the functional style that will change and improve your code. This short, targeted book will help you make the paradigm shift from the old imperative way to a less error-prone, more elegant, and concise coding style that’s also a breeze to parallelize. You’ll explore the syntax and semantics of lambda expressions, method and constructor references, and functional interfaces. You’ll design and write applications better using the new standards in Java 8 and the JDK.

Get it Now!  

Leave a Reply


five − 4 =



Java Code Geeks and all content copyright © 2010-2014, Exelixis Media Ltd | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
All trademarks and registered trademarks appearing on Java Code Geeks are the property of their respective owners.
Java is a trademark or registered trademark of Oracle Corporation in the United States and other countries.
Java Code Geeks is not connected to Oracle Corporation and is not sponsored by Oracle Corporation.
Do you want to know how to develop your skillset and become a ...
Java Rockstar?

Subscribe to our newsletter to start Rocking right now!

To get you started we give you two of our best selling eBooks for FREE!

Get ready to Rock!
You can download the complementary eBooks using the links below:
Close