About Blaise Doughan

Team lead for the TopLink/EclipseLink JAXB & SDO implementations, and the Oracle representative on those specifications.

GlassFish 3.1.2 is Full of MOXy (EclipseLink JAXB)

I am very happy to announce that EclipseLink JAXB (MOXy) is now a JAXB ( JSR-222) provider in GlassFish 3.1.2. I would like to thank the EclipseLink and GlassFish committers for all their hard work to make this happen.

In this post I will introduce how MOXy can be leveraged to create a JAX-WS service. In future posts I will cover more of the extensions in greater detail.

GlassFish can be downloaded from the following link:



Web Service (JAX-WS)

For this post we will implement a simple service that finds a customer by ID. As this is just a "Hello World" type example the service will always return a customer with the name "Jane Doe".

package blog.jaxws.service;

import javax.jws.*;
import blog.jaxws.model.Customer;

@WebService
public class FindCustomer {

 @WebMethod
 public Customer findCustomer(int id) {
  Customer customer = new Customer();
  customer.setId(id);
  customer.setFirstName("Jane");
  customer.setLastName("Doe");
  return customer;
 }

}

WEB-INF/sun-jaxws.xml

There are multiple ways to specify MOXy as the JAXB provider. My preference is to use the sun-jaxws.xml file that is located in the WEB-INF directory.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<endpoints
    xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jax-ws/ri/runtime"
    version="2.0">
    <endpoint
        name='FindCustomer'
        implementation='blog.jaxws.service.FindCustomer'
        url-pattern='/FindCustomerService'
        databinding='eclipselink.jaxb'/>
</endpoints>

Model

When MOXy is specified as the JAXB provider we can leverage all of its mapping extensions. In this example we will use @XmlPath to do XPath based mapping.

package blog.jaxws.model;

import javax.xml.bind.annotation.*;
import org.eclipse.persistence.oxm.annotations.XmlPath;

@XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD)
@XmlType(propOrder={"firstName", "lastName"})
public class Customer {

 @XmlAttribute
 private int id;

 @XmlPath("personal-info/first-name/text()")
 private String firstName;
 
 @XmlPath("personal-info/last-name/text()")
 private String lastName;

 public int getId() {
  return id;
 }

 public void setId(int id) {
  this.id = id;
 }

 public String getFirstName() {
  return firstName;
 }

 public void setFirstName(String firstName) {
  this.firstName = firstName;
 }

 public String getLastName() {
  return lastName;
 }

 public void setLastName(String lastName) {
  this.lastName = lastName;
 }

}

WSDL

Below is the WSDL that was generated for this service:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!-- Published by JAX-WS RI at http://jax-ws.dev.java.net. RI's version is Metro/2.2-b13 (branches/2.2-6964; 2012-01-09T18:04:18+0000) JAXWS-RI/2.2.6-promoted-b20 JAXWS/2.2 svn-revision#unknown. -->
<!-- Generated by JAX-WS RI at http://jax-ws.dev.java.net. RI's version is Metro/2.2-b13 (branches/2.2-6964; 2012-01-09T18:04:18+0000) JAXWS-RI/2.2.6-promoted-b20 JAXWS/2.2 svn-revision#unknown. -->
<definitions xmlns:wsu="http://docs.oasis-open.org/wss/2004/01/oasis-200401-wss-wssecurity-utility-1.0.xsd" xmlns:wsp="http://www.w3.org/ns/ws-policy" xmlns:wsp1_2="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2004/09/policy" xmlns:wsam="http://www.w3.org/2007/05/addressing/metadata" xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/soap/" xmlns:tns="http://service.jaxws.blog/" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/wsdl/" targetNamespace="http://service.jaxws.blog/" name="FindCustomerService">
    <types>
        <xsd:schema>
            <xsd:import namespace="http://service.jaxws.blog/" schemaLocation="http://www.example.com:8080/Blog-JAXWS2/FindCustomerService?xsd=1"/>
        </xsd:schema>
    </types>
    <message name="findCustomer">
        <part name="parameters" element="tns:findCustomer"/>
    </message>
    <message name="findCustomerResponse">
        <part name="parameters" element="tns:findCustomerResponse"/>
    </message>
    <portType name="FindCustomer">
        <operation name="findCustomer">
            <input wsam:Action="http://service.jaxws.blog/FindCustomer/findCustomerRequest" message="tns:findCustomer"/>
            <output wsam:Action="http://service.jaxws.blog/FindCustomer/findCustomerResponse" message="tns:findCustomerResponse"/>
        </operation>
    </portType>
    <binding name="FindCustomerPortBinding" type="tns:FindCustomer">
        <soap:binding transport="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http" style="document"/>
            <operation name="findCustomer">
                <soap:operation soapAction=""/>
                <input>
                    <soap:body use="literal"/>
                </input>
                <output>
                    <soap:body use="literal"/>
                </output>
        </operation>
    </binding>
    <service name="FindCustomerService">
        <port name="FindCustomerPort" binding="tns:FindCustomerPortBinding">
            <soap:address location="http://www.example.com:8080/Blog-JAXWS/FindCustomerService"/>
        </port>
    </service>
</definitions>

XML Schema

Below is the XML schema referenced by the WSDL that was generated for the model. Notice how it includes the "personal-info" element that was specified in the @XmlPath annotation.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!-- Published by JAX-WS RI at http://jax-ws.dev.java.net. RI's version is 
 Metro/2.2-b13 (branches/2.2-6964; 2012-01-09T18:04:18+0000) JAXWS-RI/2.2.6-promoted-b20 
 JAXWS/2.2 svn-revision#unknown. -->
<xsd:schema xmlns:ns0="http://service.jaxws.blog/" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
 targetNamespace="http://service.jaxws.blog/">
 <xsd:complexType name="findCustomerResponse">
  <xsd:sequence>
   <xsd:element name="return" type="ns0:customer" minOccurs="0" />
  </xsd:sequence>
 </xsd:complexType>
 <xsd:complexType name="findCustomer">
  <xsd:sequence>
   <xsd:element name="arg0" type="xsd:int" />
  </xsd:sequence>
 </xsd:complexType>
 <xsd:complexType name="customer">
  <xsd:sequence>
   <xsd:element name="personal-info" minOccurs="0">
    <xsd:complexType>
     <xsd:sequence>
      <xsd:element name="first-name" type="xsd:string"
       minOccurs="0" />
      <xsd:element name="last-name" type="xsd:string"
       minOccurs="0" />
     </xsd:sequence>
    </xsd:complexType>
   </xsd:element>
  </xsd:sequence>
  <xsd:attribute name="id" type="xsd:int" use="required" />
 </xsd:complexType>
 <xsd:element name="findCustomerResponse" type="ns0:findCustomerResponse" />
 <xsd:element name="findCustomer" type="ns0:findCustomer" />
</xsd:schema>

Service Request

Below is what a request to our service looks like:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<S:Envelope xmlns:S="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/">
    <S:Header/>
    <S:Body>
        <ns2:findCustomer xmlns:ns2="http://service.jaxws.blog/">
            <arg0>123</arg0>
        </ns2:findCustomer>
    </S:Body>
</S:Envelope>

Service Response

The response leverages the @XmlPath annotation we used on the Customer class to map the firstName and lastName properties to XML.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<S:Envelope xmlns:S="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/">
    <S:Body>
        <ns0:findCustomerResponse xmlns:ns0="http://service.jaxws.blog/">
            <return id="123">
                <personal-info>
                    <first-name>Jane</first-name>
                    <last-name>Doe</last-name>
                </personal-info>
            </return>
        </ns0:findCustomerResponse>
    </S:Body>
</S:Envelope>

Further Reading

If you enjoyed this post, then you may be interested in:

Reference: GlassFish 3.1.2 is Full of MOXy (EclipseLink JAXB) from our JCG partner Blaise Doughan at the Java XML & JSON Binding blog.

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